in order to provide ocean views, austin maynard architects has added an elevated dwelling to a small beach house in australia. located in the seaside town of lorne, victoria, the clients desired sweeping vistas, without damaging their current building. the answer was ‘dorman house’, a finely crafted timber box, independently constructed over the existing property. the new structure will naturally weather over time, becoming a more coherent part of the landscape.

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
all images by peter bennetts

 

 

austin maynard architects positioned the elevated extension on top of industrial-looking posts and beams. the new dwelling comprises a kitchen, dining, and living room, all accessed via a spiral staircase. carefully detailed throughout, the interior of the addition is lined with silvertop ash and responds to the coastal region’s seasonal changes throughout the day. importantly, the space avoids visually dominating the original shack.

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
beneath the new living space, a usable area is created without adding mass

 

 

beneath the new living space, a usable area is created without adding mass. ‘we have lined the space with polycarbonate, to allow an abundance of filtered light to fill the room,’ explain the architects. ‘though the old kitchen was transformed into a second bathroom and laundry, the original beach house remains mostly unchanged. it was tidied up and repainted so that the charm and character of the post-war shack was retained.’

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the new structure provides sweeping ocean views

 

 

from environmental standpoint, most of the glass faces north, while all windows are double glazed with thermally separated frames. meanwhile, the old timber decking was recycled and re-used internally. a large water tank is used to flush toilets and water the garden.

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
a spiral staircase leads to the elevated extension

 

 

however, according to the architects, the most sustainable factor was retaining the existing shack. ‘it is irrelevant how sustainable you make a new house if you knock down an existing structure,’ says the team. ‘even if you have a 9 star home, the carbon debt in the demolished house takes many decades to repay.’

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the interior of the addition is lined with silvertop ash

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the dwelling comprises a kitchen, dining, and living room

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
polycarbonate allows an abundance of filtered light to enter the downstairs room

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the residence is located in the seaside town of lorne, victoria

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the original beach house remains mostly unchanged

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
most of the glass faces north, while all windows are double glazed

austin-maynard-architects-dorman-house-lorne-victoria-australia-designboom-02
the dwelling is sited on top of industrial-looking posts and beams

 

 

project info:

 

architect: austin maynard architects
project team:
 andrew maynard, mark austin, natalie miles
site area: 484 sqm
existing: 67 sqm
addition: 59 sqm (35 sqm ground + 24 sqm first)
total area: 126 sqm
completion date: december 2015
builder: spence construction
engineer: robin bliem & associates
photography: peter bennetts

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

    have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.

    comments policy
    LOG IN
    designboom's comment policy guidelines
    generally speaking, if we publish something, it's because we're genuinely interested in the subject. we hope you'll share this interest and if you know even more about it, please share! our goal in the discussion threads is to have good conversation and we prefer constructive opinions. we and our readers have fun with entertaining ones. designboom welcomes alerts about typos, incorrect names, and the like.
    the correction is at the discretion of the post editor and may not happen immediately.

    what if you disagree with what we or another commenter has to say?
    let's hear it! but please understand that offensive, inappropriate, or just plain annoying comments may be deleted or shortened.

    - please do not make racist, sexist, anti-semitic, homophobic or otherwise offensive comments.
    - please don't personally insult the writers or your fellow commenters.
    - please avoid using offensive words, replacing a few letters with asterisks is not a valid workaround.
    - please don't include your website or e-mail address in your comments for the purpose of self-promotion.
    - please respect jury verdicts and do not discuss offensively on the competition results
    (there is only one fist prize, and designboom usually asks renown professionals to help us to promote talent.
    in addition to the awarded designs, we do feel that almost all deserve our attention, that is why we publish
    the best 100-200 entries too.)

    a link is allowed in comments as long as they add value in the form of information, images, humor, etc. (links to the front page of your personal blog or website are not okay). unwelcome links (to commercial products or services of others, offensive material etc. ) will be redacted. and, ... yes, spam gets banned. no, we do not post fake comments.

    architecture news