carterwilliamson converts livestock shelter into cowshed house carterwilliamson converts livestock shelter into cowshed house
jul 20, 2013

carterwilliamson converts livestock shelter into cowshed house

carterwilliamson converts a livestock shelter into ‘cowshed house’
image © brett boardman
all images courtesy of carterwilliamsonarchitects

 

 

 

carterwilliamson updates an abandoned livestock shelter, transforming it into ‘cowshed house’, a single family home in glebe, a suburb of sydney, australia. the brick walled structure defines the edge along the urban street, enclosing a private courtyard in the northern part of the site. although the building was structurally unsound, the existing materials were left in place where possible and reused throughout the project, thereby minimizing waste. in keeping with its agrarian tectonics, large timber beams used to support the upper floor were left exposed, windows and doors were framed in wood, and a corrugated metal skin finished the upper floor. these simple, robust materials speak to the project’s environmental and economic sustainability. the height at the corner pronounces the dwelling’s presence in the gentrifying neighborhood. its prominent silhouette also serves to prevent leaves from the nearby jacaranda tree in the yard from filling the gutter, and subsequently flooding the house. along this high roof line a clerestory band lets light and air enter the house, while their height assures privacy. inside, the living room, kitchen, and dining area are all open to one another and to the courtyard, which is separated by a large tri-part sliding glass door. the children’s bedrooms, furnished with hammocks, enclose the property to the southeast, forming an L-shaped plan. the master bedroom suite occupies the upper floor above the kitchen.

 

 


(left): entering the house from the street
(right): the house is open to the courtyard, an extension of the living room
images © brett boardman

 

 


(left): the open plan living areas and master bedroom above
(right): exposed brick and oak beams maintain the original aesthetic
images © brett boardman

 

 


the original kitchen was left in place during the renovation
image © brett boardman

 

 


master bedroom mezzanine occupies the corner of the lot, giving the house prominence in the neighborhood
image © brett boardman

 

 
(left): bedroom complete with hammock
(right): downstairs bathroom; red is a tribute to the family’s venezuelan heritage
images © brett boardman

 

 


the original brick structure is extended, defining the street edge and leaving a private inner courtyard
 image © brett boardman

 

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