cheungvogl: 2 houses cheungvogl: 2 houses
mar 11, 2010

cheungvogl: 2 houses

‘2 houses’ in tokyo, japan

‘2 houses’, a commissioned project developed by hong kong based architectural
firm cheungvogl consists of two nearly identical housing units, occupying
two identical plots in tokyo, japan. these neighbouring houses stand side by side, related
yet separated. simple detailing, rough concrete and aged timber are elements that tie
the two houses together. in its interior, the connection to the outside is reduced down
to two linear courtyards. contrary to the openness of the ground floor, the pitched roof
is a small space enclosing the staircase.

the choices in materials, which consists of fair-face in-situ and pre-cast concrete,
industrially finished flooring and local construction techniques, make these homes economical.


‘2 houses’ interior


staircase leading to the enclosed roof


sectional view


site plan

  • Sensitive design.
    Beautiful project from inside out / outside in.

    Takahashi says:
  • wouldn’t they be more economical (and less brutal/inhospitable) in wood? Im guessing the architects have never lived in a concrete building (or through western modernism) before

    justasking says:
  • this is from a firm in hong kong ‘justasking’. i think they understand concrete buildings.

    jpa says:
  • lovely!

    hompegage says: they from hong kong, project is in tokyo, japan – land of concrete…

    tadao ando rocks!

    tbc says:
  • well, at least some people like it 🙂

    justasking says:
  • it is so nice! the texture of concrete, no curves at all – so simple, and yet, so catchy! thumbs up!

    siriwat says:
  • very poetic. great design!

    catalan says:
  • Perfect walls for some contrasting graffiti!

    Mark says:
  • stunning

    Mr. K says:
  • only let Bansky lay hands on these walls!!!

    Carta says:
  • these guys rock! yeah, it’s in tokyo

    Kumi says:
  • still think it looks like a gulag…

    justsaying says:
  • Love it. Beautiful spaces!!
    sensitive work and the concrete fits perfectly in Tokyo.

    japanese says:
  • just checked out their other projects,
    all with absolute sensual quality !

    justsay says:
  • best ever.

    concrete textures + light/shadow + orthogonal design:
    amazing to see simplicity striking out in a design-world of curves and parametrics. this design really brings it all to the point!

    observer says:
  • calm and quiet !

    Great project.

    Space says:
  • The project is looking very nice and I am sure that when it will be complete it will looks awesome homes that never had been built before. I like the concept and the interior of houses very much.

    elvis.barron says:
  • LAMENTO QUE O SER HUMANO TENHA SIDO ESQUECIDO, NA DUREZA E RIGOR DO PROJETO

    RENATO TELES says:
  • beautiful project

    totoro says:
  • only an architect could live in such a brutal construction.

    moty says:
  • …wordless….

    …just so cool!

    ….love it!

    Daedalos says:
  • Beautiful project and congratulations!
    Clients love the work. Thank you for all.

    san says:
  • Most beautiful bunker ever ! And no waste of space.

    yann says:
  • iconic

    bradshaw says:
  • At the first glance its very poetic and zen.
    This project has a strong sense of the Berlin Wall in the war zone, a little concrete jail like, very cold.
    Suddenly felt the Japanese life and its sensibility disappearing…
    its becoming love & hate in the cross road.
    Isolation and distance.

    Not very Japanese after all.

    nic says:
  • This is isolation architecture of the worst kind. A brutal prison camp like shell, maybe they think its artistic – its not. It will be striking but for the wrong reasons. It sticks its fingers up at its surroundings – it says ‘you cant come in’ and ‘i am better off than you’, and as pointed out by others creates a guetto environment outside ready for graffiti and dirt. Concrete can be a beautiful material (although highly un eco), but not as seen here. Pictures 2 and 3 best show what they are actually creating.

    AT says:
  • did someone forget we are in the 2000’s? this project seems to come out of somewhere in central europe derelict war zone 1946.

    nik says:
  • architecture creating strong emotions, specially for a private residential, is quite rare in a wide offer of faceless, emotionless architecture all around the world. creating privacy and sensuality of that kind in the densest populated city in such a simple and reduced way is quite amazing.
    so if i was asked about my emotions, i have to say, i love it indeed.

    soe says:

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.

comments policy
LOG IN
designboom's comment policy guidelines
generally speaking, if we publish something, it's because we're genuinely interested in the subject. we hope you'll share this interest and if you know even more about it, please share! our goal in the discussion threads is to have good conversation and we prefer constructive opinions. we and our readers have fun with entertaining ones. designboom welcomes alerts about typos, incorrect names, and the like.
the correction is at the discretion of the post editor and may not happen immediately.

what if you disagree with what we or another commenter has to say?
let's hear it! but please understand that offensive, inappropriate, or just plain annoying comments may be deleted or shortened.

- please do not make racist, sexist, anti-semitic, homophobic or otherwise offensive comments.
- please don't personally insult the writers or your fellow commenters.
- please avoid using offensive words, replacing a few letters with asterisks is not a valid workaround.
- please don't include your website or e-mail address in your comments for the purpose of self-promotion.
- please respect jury verdicts and do not discuss offensively on the competition results
(there is only one fist prize, and designboom usually asks renown professionals to help us to promote talent.
in addition to the awarded designs, we do feel that almost all deserve our attention, that is why we publish
the best 100-200 entries too.)

a link is allowed in comments as long as they add value in the form of information, images, humor, etc. (links to the front page of your personal blog or website are not okay). unwelcome links (to commercial products or services of others, offensive material etc. ) will be redacted. and, ... yes, spam gets banned. no, we do not post fake comments.

(28 articles)

architecture news