daiken met architects / nawakenji m: sugoroku office daiken met architects / nawakenji m: sugoroku office
mar 01, 2012

daiken met architects / nawakenji m: sugoroku office

‘shipping container studio’ by daiken-met architects, gifu, japan image © shinkenchiku-sha

japanese practice daiken-met architects have designed and completed ‘sugoroku office’, their personal studio in gifu, japan. a three storey mobile framework supports stacked shipping containers, forming the work areas and future living spaces on the penthouse floor. this building represents a model solution for those interested in surpassing the difficulty involved with making rental contracts for small scale structures in their city as well as responding to the local dilemmas of decreasing population and increasing vacant land.

the firm obtained a short-term contract by proposing a temporary structure which does not require construction below street level. the steel structural grid may be easily assembled and serves to reduce loads on the containers from the weight of its shell, furniture and users. upon completion of the lease, the structure may be disassembled and reconstructed elsewhere. a casing pipe joint in the middle of columns enable and simplify this process. storage systems were formed with used plywood or packing bands found on construction sites.

ground level entry image © shinkenchiku-sha

side elevation with ground level entry and stair to first floor image © shinkenchiku-sha

ground floor studio space image © shinkenchiku-sha

first floor kitchen image © shinkenchiku-sha

view from surrounding context image © shinkenchiku-sha

view from across the street image © shinkenchiku-sha

during construction

section

axonometric of structural frame

project info:

location: gifu, japan design: daiken met, nawakenji-m use: office, housing total floor area: 111 m2 completed: 2011

  • Why do they even need a steel frame?

    Mo says:
  • because they have Earth Quake !! I can\’t imagine what will happen if they don\’t build a rigid internal construction to fix different containers together !

    Keichow says:
  • for the balcony

    re says:
  • Why, in Europe, this is absolutely impossible:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_design

    antonio mota says:
  • It is a good used of container, too many containers sit in the east coast from the transport industry. I see use it in parking space. instant make more shops or office available in downtown

    NuNu says:
  • I dont fully understand the rationale here, they have increasing aged population and increasing vacant land and need to build a temporary structure?

    Les says:
  • looks nice, though I’d never move into any of these home modern homes.

    [url=http://www.preisvergleichstromanbieter24.org] thomaz [/url] says:
  • No point or using industrialized containers if the steel frame is used. Maybe it would be cheaper to build a shell with light gauge steel frame. Industrialized containers are already stackable to start with. I don’t understand this design.

    Mo says:
  • I cant see this being anything past a cheap set up. There doesnt seem to be any wider issues being addressed.
    The area is decaying and the community is dispersing. Wheres the intervention? Where is the Architecture?

    Egal says:
  • the firm obtained a short-term contract by proposing a temporary structure which does not require construction
    below street level. the steel structural grid may be easily assembled and serves to reduce loads on the containers from the weight of its shell, furniture and users. upon completion of the lease, the structure may be disassembled and reconstructed elsewhere. a casing pipe joint in the middle of columns enable and simplify this process.

    CM says:
  • I love this design, but what Mo says is still true. The space frame seems superfluous and requires considerably more area. The containers can be stack ten high with strength to spare even when full. It’s still cool!

    siloboy says:
  • what happens in the basement?

    marie says:
  • super cool!

    Alberta says:

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