echoviren pavilion: the world's first 3D printed architecture echoviren pavilion: the world's first 3D printed architecture
aug 26, 2013

echoviren pavilion: the world's first 3D printed architecture

echoviren pavilion: the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 

smith | allen, a collabortive duo working out of oakland, california, USA has created the first entirely 3D printed architectural structure. situated in the light-dappled bucolic redwood forest, the modular pavilion is site-responsive, mimicking and abstracting the xylem and phloem of the lush life that surrounds the built piece. the work, commissioned as part of project 387, itself a experimental multidisciplinary program of artists, designers and makers, consists of 585 interlocking components printed over the course of 10,800 hours. the 10x10x8 foot structure took four days to assembly in the pristine site and sets in motion the beginning of a symbiotic relationship with the forest– the pavilion is a composition of plant-based bio plastics which allow the form to decompose and create myriad micro-habitats as the lace-like walls integrate into the ecosystem. 

 

 


the video details the fabrication and assembly process
video © TERRA TOXIS

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


echoviren pavilion reportedly the world’s first 3D printed architecture
image © smith | allen studio

 

 


prototype view
image © smith | allen studio

  • This is pointless. It is 3D printed but it’s not how 3D-printed buildings should work. It has bricks for crying out loud. A 3D-printed building should be one shape and printed on site. Not some fancy bricks printed somewhere and then stacked together somewhere else…We already do that. That first pic got me excited, and it is a nice shape. Just not a 3D-printed building, not to me.

    Thomas Valcke says:
  • Totally agree Thomas, this “first 3D printed” frenzy is getting on my nerves and some people are just creating things on 3D printers because it´s a novelty and to get the “first 3D printed something” stamp on it, not because of some innovation point of view.

    To me for this to happen, a truly “the first 3D printed house”, first we have to invent a massive 3D printer, that can print in really large sizes and can be dislocated to the site of the construction, after that just see it print floor by floor, a bit like it happens with modern skyscrapers but every floor is made of ONE 3d printed piece and all you need is that huge printer and the material to feed it.
    Now that´s going to be different and innovative, not take a already made technology and make blocks with it, I appreciate the effort, but I dont see the big fuzz about it.

    what? says:
  • anyone can print a bricks, then build a shack with it and call it “world first 3D printed house” give me a break people, kidding me ?

    michal kukucka says:
  • Love this concept using small scale printer technology. Can only imagine the possibilities when using large scale robotic printer for complex shapes.

    mArkW says:
  • is this even a building?

    ASIG Design says:
  • As an architect licensed in many states, I do not consider this architecture. Art maybe, but not even shelter is this stack.

    Dean Tidwell AIA says:
  • @thomas, this is very impressive for the technology available to normal folk like you and I. There are the huge types of 3D printers that could print out pre-fab walls with wiring, support, insulation, etc, to achieve your “one shape” building, but these large scale printers cost millions. What is so impressive about this project is that it was done with a consumer printer that the normal folk can actually afford. Also being such a labor intensive process of printing so many pieces to fit perfectly together is a whole other can of worms that may have not crossed your mind. This project definitely deserves the respect and impact of what you can do with printers right now, in your home. Also check here to explain why it is called a “building”: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Building (dean tidwell, you should know this)

    fisher says:
  • Beautiful – occulus light qualities – varied within modular

    kerouacREM says:
  • @fisher
    “Also being such a labor intensive process of printing so many pieces to fit perfectly together is a whole other can of worms that may have not crossed your mind.”

    It´s not that labor intensive, you can do that with any CAD program easily, do the main shape in one piece, see how much does the 3d printer size is, then cut accordingly.
    Please, I understand your point of view, but dont try to make it look difficult to make.

    Difficult would be to make a one-piece house fully functional. Difficult and innovative.

    What? says:
  • I don’t see how this is architecture? I thought architecture is meant to house people or objects. It doesn’t even have a roof. Surely it falls under the sculpture category?

    Max Pieters says:

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.

comments policy
LOG IN
designboom's comment policy guidelines
generally speaking, if we publish something, it's because we're genuinely interested in the subject. we hope you'll share this interest and if you know even more about it, please share! our goal in the discussion threads is to have good conversation and we prefer constructive opinions. we and our readers have fun with entertaining ones. designboom welcomes alerts about typos, incorrect names, and the like.
the correction is at the discretion of the post editor and may not happen immediately.

what if you disagree with what we or another commenter has to say?
let's hear it! but please understand that offensive, inappropriate, or just plain annoying comments may be deleted or shortened.

- please do not make racist, sexist, anti-semitic, homophobic or otherwise offensive comments.
- please don't personally insult the writers or your fellow commenters.
- please avoid using offensive words, replacing a few letters with asterisks is not a valid workaround.
- please don't include your website or e-mail address in your comments for the purpose of self-promotion.
- please respect jury verdicts and do not discuss offensively on the competition results
(there is only one fist prize, and designboom usually asks renown professionals to help us to promote talent.
in addition to the awarded designs, we do feel that almost all deserve our attention, that is why we publish
the best 100-200 entries too.)

a link is allowed in comments as long as they add value in the form of information, images, humor, etc. (links to the front page of your personal blog or website are not okay). unwelcome links (to commercial products or services of others, offensive material etc. ) will be redacted. and, ... yes, spam gets banned. no, we do not post fake comments.

architecture news