hideyuki nakayama architecture: o house   update hideyuki nakayama architecture: o house   update
jan 30, 2011

hideyuki nakayama architecture: o house update

‘o house’ by hideyuki nakayama architecture in kyoto, japan all images courtesy eizo okada image by daichi ano

designboom’s friend and dezain.net’s editor-in-chief eizo okada has sent us images of his family’s home, ‘o house’ in kyoto, japan. a year after our original post on the project designed by hideyuki nakayama architecture, we get an exclusive look at the dwelling after it has been lived in.

exaggerated in form and shape, the narrow two-storey design features a fully glazed street facade that puts on display the activity of the house. in order to create private while controlling the amount of natural daylight entering the interior, textile designer akane moriyama has custom-made a single curtain that hangs from floor to ceiling. during the evening, the slight translucency of the fabric allows the house to glow from inside out.

for more information on the design, click here for our previous coverage of the house.

(left) living space as seen from the outside (right) upper level images by mitsuo okamoto

hallway image by mitsuo okamoto

the ground floor seen from the second level image by mitsuo okamoto

dining area image by mitsuo okamoto

circular nook image by mitsuo okamoto

images by mitsuo okamoto

image by mitsuo okamoto

the street facade during the night

  • It is the architecture for the architect.

    micky says:
  • Hi!

    Is that just a single piece of glass for the gable? How was that made, transported, and installed without breaking? (It’s quite an achievement!)

    Also; do you know how the gable (forming a frame for this glass) is kept rigid? It seems that any deflection would cause the glass to warp (or even break).

    Paul A
    (UK – Structural Engineer)

    Paul A says:
  • No toilette, no bathroom and no bedroom??? Strange…

    Peter27 says:
  • … and the kitchen???

    Peter27 says:
  • Such cold, ascetic architecture.

    Anais says:
  • its all behind door #1, peter.
    design before function-please!

    osmosis8 says:
  • refreshing, we love the look at night

    moderndesign2120 says:
  • Thank you for your comments. Now I live in this house with my family. We are very happy.
    Please also check following video!

    http://vimeo.com/18978088

    That shows bath space, kitchen and futon (not bed).

    Eizo says:
  • I like it, the coldness of the architecture is made warm by the life inside the home. The only thing that is really unsettling to me is the incredibly exhibitionistic window into the street. Maybe it’s a cultural thing, but I come from a Middle Eastern culture where homes are built inside walled gardens to allow for the privacy of the inhabitants. The window, the defining feature of this beautiful home, doesn’t open to a view of a garden or nature, but to the neighborhood street. Is this a sign of the changing nature of privacy in a connected post Facebook era?

    Ali says:
  • Prison cell chic! A quirky use of a small space but the smooth clean lines and cold stack interiors seem to be more about architectural ascetics than homely functioning spaces. As another wrote here “It is the architecture for the architect.”

    andrew burns says:
  • interesting experiment, but I just wonder for a plot of land of such size, can you build it slightly larger? is it restricted by planning regulation or by the architect’s choice? as it seems that there is still quite a bit of space at the front lawn…
    looks as if from the video there are some small operable windows on the side, how is the orientation of the building?
    must have been quite dream like as one wakes up in the morning…

    douglas ho says:
  • clear physical spaces = an open mind.

    wizard says:
  • What is it with those 3 doors? What is behind them? I presume the adjacent house? Makes for a boring space. To reiterate: plans would be nice! I enjoy the assymetry and ingenuity of the space, but it is very austere. No personal touches, or bursts of colour. Lack of homeliness gives impression of a towering garden shed.

    Leslie Wilson-Rutterford says:
  • It’s great that this family experiments with an open scheme. As long as the children are young it might be the best possible way of organizing the living space.

    Katarina Fruebe says:
  • It is not one pece of glass, but in section. the top is set like all glass with braces, either metal or wood, then siliconed or with rubber ‘gaskets’ for flexibility.

    land is exspensive…it’s like an architects zoo house. But a great exercise home!

    mary shaffer says:
  • Well isn’t this just socially irresponsible…

    Adan says:

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