komada architects office: HAT house, japan komada architects office: HAT house, japan
jan 23, 2013

komada architects office: HAT house, japan

‘HAT house’ by komada architects, tokyo, japan

image © toshihiro

all images courtesy of komada architects

 

 

tokyo-based architects takeshi and yuka komada are re-imagining the possibilities of the small urban infill lot with their ‘HAT house’, an elegant exercise in urban dwelling. located on a small corner site in the suginami-ku section of tokyo, the architects strove to combat urban congestion and redefine the relationship of interior and exterior by developing a symmetrical square plan with two open decks. these ‘wings’ make use of the corner site by creating a continuous horizontal first floor plane, interrupted only by the sliding glass doors.

this minimalist veranda is covered by a ‘hat-like’ asymmetrical roof. the glazing on all four sides of the house provides views of the nearby parkand visually widen the occupiable space. the basement level is a carpark, in keeping with the vertical thinking that so characterizes urban living. each corner of the two story house contains a different private program, among them, storerooms, toilets, a staircase, and most remarkably a komoreru room – a space of calm in the surrounding urban streetscape.

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

a view through one on the central axis. the balconies are protected by the overhanging roof

image © toshihiro

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

the cruciform space was envisioned as the bustling area of daily activity; the corner rooms provide structure and modules of privacy and circulation

image © toshihiro

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

numerous apertures afford views of the park entrance and dense urban streetscape, while still providing an separate space for study

image © toshihiro

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

(left) study room

(right) staircase.

image © toshihiro

 

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

the second floor contains the lofted bedrooms but keeps the symmetrical spatial organization and open plan

image © toshihiro

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

a sloped ceiling with a skylight allows for the maximum entrance of light despite the proximity to the neighboring property

image © toshihiro

 

 

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

floor plan / level -1:  carpark plan

 

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

floor plan / level 0

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

floor plan / level 1

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

floor plan / level 2

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

section

 

 

 

komada architects: HAT house, japan

elevation

 

 

if you can’t get enough of houses like these, head over to huffington post to see 11 other small homes that live large.

  • I totally get it now. Japanese architects absolutely hate space. That’s the only reasonable explanation why almost every single Japanese project presented on this website takes an already small plot, and reduces the living space further by creating a floor plan where all of the “rooms” in the house basically aren’t anything more than nooks and crannies.

    Erik says:
  • Even though the bedroom space is very limited, i like how they used the space on the first floor (living area). I like this project a lot, but the bedrooms could use some work for some added privacy.

    David says:
  • see atelier bow-wow’s “gae house,” a nice comparison

    jeremy says:
  • Love the play of light here. Comfy home and practical, and not too outstanding in a neighbourhood.

    LincolnHo says:
  • la rotonda

    nikos says:
  • I cannot understand that “study” room. It is kinda I wanna kill my eyes, and then kill my self. How can close yourself in a box with no windows and then expect to be creative and productive…Absolut nonsense. If I have to mention anything on the bedrooms …Erik said it all – no privacy. These badroom could have done the work in a hostel …At least one propper shoud have been designed

    pluck says:
  • Love that study room. So zen. So culturally, and historically Japanese. Why do people with absolutely no concept of other cultures judge so harshly? Privacy? What would you understand of another culture’s mindset when it’s so different than yours? You don’t even make an attempt to learn. So terribly narrow minded!

    Mary Anne Enriqurz says:

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