remcosiebring_mirrormirror

 

 

situated on the roof of a classified monument in a small northern dutch town, mirror mirror on a roof designed by amsterdam-based studio remco siebring serves as an elevated home for a twelve year-old boy. the cubed structure takes cues from the concept of a tree house, sitting high above any surrounding building amid the tree canopies, the views provide a bird’s eye landscape of the town. each facade clad in mirrored glass creates an architectural duality in function and aesthetic. during the day, the building reflects everything around it rendering it almost invisible when viewed from the street as the line separating sky and structure is neatly obscured. at night time as internal lights are switched on the dwelling becomes a glowing lantern. 

remcosiebring_mirrormirror
the addition is easily recognized in the small dutch skyline
all images courtesy of studio remco siebring

 

 

while on the outside the structure takes on a rather futuristic and clean look, remco siebring designed the interior using standard materials to create a stunning environment. the wood-framed walls are covered in sheets of top-grade pinewood creating a timber interior illuminated by large rectangular windows on each facade. the material selection further supports the idea of a tree house, using wood to allude to the tree tops, while a steel shelf supported three meters above the bottom floor level serves as the perch in the branches- a cantilevered mezzanine containing the bed. the addition features a relatively simple program for its single inhabitant- a bedroom, office, and entry space, each open to the other.

remcosiebring_mirrormirror
the mirrored facade seamlessly reflects its surroundings, disappearing into the sky
remcosiebring_mirrormirror
a double-height entry area with large windows on all surrounding walls allows for plenty of natural light and almost continuous views of the exterior, helping further to create a ‘tree house’ feel

remcosiebring_mirrormirror

wooden planks and pinewood sheets make up the interior construction of the structure

remcosiebring_mirrormirror

the bed is located on a steel mezzanine almost floating above the center of the room
remcosiebring_mirrormirror

remcosiebring_mirrormirror
the house is connected to the main living space below through an interior hallway

remcosiebring_mirrormirror

remcosiebring_mirrormirror
original concept sketch

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  • R.i.p. birds

    Ricardo says:
  • Some very stylish elements. Too bad the budget would not accommodate an interior.

    Jim

    JimCan says:
  • I hope this 12-year old enjoys picking up the dead birds that will be littered around this structure. “During the day, the building reflects everything around it RENDERING IT ALMOST INVISIBLE when viewed from the street as the line separating sky and structure is neatly obscured.” Yeah. Listen, we all love the way a mirror looks but seriously: stop building these without any thought to how they interact with the natural world. The irony of these buildings is that architects want to give the appearance of a “seamless” blend with nature all while creating a literal death trap for actual nature.

    Tara Donnelly says:
  • Completely agree with Tara Donnelly. Thought about piles of dead bird bodies popped in an instant after I saw this mirror facade perfectly blending into the natural environment.
    It’s a mystery how people do not think about consequences before putting their amazing ideas into motion. It’s like as long as law can’t punish you it doesn’t matter that non-human lives are being put in danger. I propose that mirror structures should be banned from use if it takes more than specific area (this should be decided by whoever is responsible for implementation of such things).

    Krintin Ah says:
  • Can you tell me the company that made the mirrors? I want to buy the material for my roof top.

    Appreciate if you can send me any contact info via email – thanks!

    Scott says:

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