in 20 cities — from sacramento to sydney — konstantin dimopoulos has, quite literally, made a mark on the environment. in an effort to emphasize the ephemeral quality of nature, and raise awareness of environmental issues, the egyptian-born, new zealand-based artist is using a non-toxic, non-permanent pigment to paint ‘blue trees’. ‘I have always known that art is, and has always has been, an extended part of nature and that art can effect social change,’ dimopoulos says of his interest in public art. ‘for that to happen one has to move out of the art institutions and galleries and move outside among nature and human beings in their living spaces.’


photo by david brown photography / all images courtesy of konstantin dimopoulos

 

 

dimopoulos’ ongoing ‘blue trees’ project seeks to express a message of social consciousness and ecological awareness, particularly with regard to ecocide and the deliberate destruction of forests. in both cities and natural landscapes, the artist comes together with volunteers from the community to transform trees into canvases for color and creative expression. ‘I think of the blue trees as an artwork that has a strong regenerative aspect to it, an organic work that is continually changing and evolving from site to site,’ dimopoulos continues. ‘from season to season the trees grow through the cycles of nature and the colors also begin to change and disappear. there is a sense of time as a part of the concept. time that determines our own existence is measured through these trees.’


‘the blue trees’ colorize the landscape of mississauga, canada

 

 

the artist is currently working on his latest installation in pointe claire, montreal. ‘wish you were here’ is made of timber, red paint, and steel, and draws on dimopoulos’ own experience as an immigrant to investigate themes of loss, memory, and abandonment.


‘blue trees’ for the vancouver biennale in canada


an installation of ‘blue trees’ in breckenridge, colorado


the project in breckenridge was commissioned by the breckenridge international festival of the arts


the project is conceived as an environmental call to action


installation in pirrama park in sydney | photo by nikki to


the installation in chattanooga, tennessee intends to highlight ecological issues | photo by david brown photography


‘the blue trees’ in kunzelsau, germany

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