bikers rest by marcus abrahamsson for nola bikers rest by marcus abrahamsson for nola
feb 12, 2013

bikers rest by marcus abrahamsson for nola

 

‘bikers rest’ by marcus abrahamsson for nola

 

 

traffic lights are annoying to motorists and cyclists alike. from within the comfort of a car, waiting at a red light is a matter of keeping a foot on the brake, but for cyclists, it can be a delicate balancing act – cyclists need to stay upright to quickly wheel out of the way of cars when the light turns green.

 

the ‘bikers rest’ bollard for nola by swedish designer marcus abrahamsson gives cyclists a footrest to lean against and a handle to hold on to while waiting for the light to change. the metal mesh insert on the footrest provides a grip to push off from, while the handle helps the cyclist maintain an upright position and contact with the saddle. crafted from tubular steel and extruded metal, the pillar coordinates well with most features in the urban landscape.

 

rear view

 

 

detail

 

 

detail

 

 

 

bikers rest color variation

 

  • lovely idea – but bet there would be a race and fight to be the one who gets to use it!

    sam says:
  • ??? whats wrong with just putting your foot on the ground???? Pointless!
    like the choice of colours though..

    graham says:
  • on top of that the guy on the first picture is riding a fixie, so he doesn’t need to put his foot on the ground anyway…….

    antoine says:
  • sometimes I track stand, sometimes I put my feet on the floor, sometimes when im feeling super clever i put a singular foot on the curb… or sometimes i just grab a nearby barrier… nature and the urban environment offer a fair few solutions to this problem… maybe in more cycling friendly countries this would increase efficiency of traffic flow by a few percent, maybe it means more people though the lights each time… I wouldnt call it pointless but Im not sure its necessary but then again I live in a city that is poorly designed for cyclists..

    Jamie Josef Fry says:
  • can you imagine these things before a lightstop in holland or in china? being democratic, you’ll need hundreds of them

    hans van kooten says:
  • I sure hope he did not spent $4-10k on a patent. ..see that all the time with ideas that come from people working in caves.

    Jim

    JimCan says:
  • And who manufactures the gray bike the man is sitting on?
    THAT I find more interesting than a pole I would run into at night!
    “Reflectify” it….
    Then your talkin’ business..

    opopindekerk says:
  • You must ask yourself if, in a country like Holland, where the cities are full of cyclists as we know, people would use it. Cyclists in Holland don’t stop at all at traffic lights!

    BeKa says:
  • Thank god. Now I won’t fall over at every red light and stop sign.

    Nigel Schuster says:
  • This is a wonderful idea. It would be a great help in Southern California except for the fact that the vast vast majority of cyclists here do not pay much attention to stop signs or the rules of the road which apply to all vehicles.
    You would be hard put to find a cyclist stopping at a stop sign. If there is no auto coming they will assume to be entitled to go on through if they can get away with it.
    The motorcyclists can and do follow those guidelines but then the bicycle is a slower form of transportation.
    This would be superb in the urban core. It would encourage the stop by making it more comfortable.

    Ron Smith says:
  • I’m glad to see all responses, positive and negative, we are all in the game to improve everyday life here, in this case for cyclists. It is important as a designer to imagine a variety of situations and contexts when you design. You cannot, as many above, think “I don’t need this on MY way to school” nor “None of my young hip fixy bike friends need this”. You have to think further. Who is not commuting by bike today? Which aid could help to broaden the commuting mass?

    Here in Sweden and in, for example, Denmark and other countries working actively on an urban scale, so called “green highways” are established, these are traffic separated bicycle paths in to cities. For this and many other situations we have come to a conclusion that this product is needed. Right or wrong, time will tell. It is important that we stay experimental and challenge the current way we do things all the time. Isn’t it?

    As pointed out above, the concept is tested in Copenhagen (see link straight above). This was the starting point for the design, however, what we could see as a huge approval from this example was to instead of creating a barrier, we much rather aimed towards a pole, using the natural distance created by the size of a bike.

    Marcus Abrahamsson, designer and architect, Sweden

    Marcus Abrahamsson says:

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