high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for modern-day penny farthing high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for modern-day penny farthing
mar 10, 2014

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for modern-day penny farthing

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing
all images courtesy standard highwheels

 

 

 

established in 2013 by swedish architect per-olof kippel, standard highwheels reintroduces the challenge and drama of high-wheel bicycles. the unlikely marriage of man and machine becomes evident on a penny farther, an image lost by the ubiquity of conventional bikes.

 

the hand-made high-wheel bicycles are direct drive, meaning the cranks and pedals are directly connected to the hub; the front wheel can be enlarged to increase maximum speed – the bigger the wheel, the faster the bike. the frame is constructed out of a single tube that follows the circumference of the front wheel, diverting to a trailing rear wheel. all parts and components have been carefully designed; the bike features a high quality stainless steel handlebar, a classic leather saddle and polished hub and pedals. they come in two sizes – 48 and 52 inches – and can be slightly adjusted by changing the crank arm length.

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing

the unlikely marriage of man and machine becomes evidently obvious on a penny farther

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing

 each high-wheel bicycle is built by hand

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing
the bike features a high quality stainless steel handlebar, a classic leather saddle and polished hub and pedals

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing
 detail views

high-wheeled bicycles by standard highwheels for luxury penny farthing

 

 

you can buy a high-wheeled bicycle by standard highwheels here

  • The term ‘Penny Farthing’ was a pejorative term for what is more correctly referred to as an ‘Ordinary Bicycle’. This was to differentiate it from the ‘Safety Bicycle’ which is the double diamond frame bicycles we ride today. ‘High Wheeler’ works as well…..

    michael downes says:
  • I think this is the fastest way to loose your face (quite literally).

    federico says:
  • Pennies and farthings were coins in Britain before decimalisation came in – a penny had quite a large diameter and a farthing was very small, the name was coined (pun intended) in reference to the bicycles wheels.

    anton says:
  • “the bigger the wheel, the faster the bike”…and the harder it will be to get the thing rolling, and the harder you’ll hit the ground when you fall. There are good reasons why this style of bike fell out of favour! How does a sentimental revisitation of obsolete technology qualify as good design?

    Chris says:
  • The ‘safety cycle’ (normal bike) was designed in reaction to the amount of serious injuries and deaths caused by people falling off of Penny Farthing’s / High Wheeler’s. I know that retro and cycling are both cool at the moment but some things really should be left in the past.

    Barry says:
  • To the previous commentators:
    Have you no respect for the art instilled in such a design? The technology may be dated, some may say it is obsolete, however the people in charge of designing the modern Penny Farthing deserve a standing ovation at their improvement of the classic and elegant design, along with their crafting skills and extraordinary execution.
    Safety is a concern, but even with the ‘safety cycle’, nearly 7500 cyclists are injured per year in Canada, alone. Shit happens, however, if practiced safely we can still experience and appreciate this retro-beauty.

    Katie says:
  • Now I know what Bruce Springstein was talking about when he mentioned “suicide machines” in that song.

    Chuck says:
  • Interested in purchasing how much ?

    Dennis Sauer says:

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