kiki van eijk explores the balance between nature and technology at design miami/ basel kiki van eijk explores the balance between nature and technology at design miami/ basel
jun 14, 2016

kiki van eijk explores the balance between nature and technology at design miami/ basel

kiki van eijk explores the balance between nature and technology at design miami/ basel
‘civilized primitives’ table lamp, 2016
75 x 40 x 140 cm
bronze, anodized aluminium, textile
limited edition
all images courtesy of mariëlle leenders

 

 

 

 

design miami/ basel 2016: kiki van eijk is recognized for her particular material sensibilities, in which she combines new and old techniques to render her chosen mediums into unexpected design objects. as our world is becoming increasingly connected, she finds herself embracing technology while still engaging in traditional, low-craft practices—finding a balance between past and present.
kiki van eijk design miami nilufar gallery designboom
kiki van eijk explores the balance between nature and technology at design miami/ basel
‘civilized primitives’ curved lamp, 2016
167 x 40 x 200 cm
bronze
limited edition

 

 

 

on the occasion of design miami/ basel 2016, nilufar gallery presents two of kiki van eijk‘s collections: ‘physical interaction’ and ‘civilized primitives’. comprising eleven pieces in total, both series explore aspects of nature expressed through a visual balance of organic and man-made forms, controlled motion and warm light, projecting the dutch designer’s signature whimsical, but substantive aesthetic.

kiki van eijk design miami nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ A-frame daybed, 2016
197 x 91 x 167 cm
bronze, anodized aluminium, textile
limited edition

 

 

 

‘civilized primitives’ can be cited as being born from van eijk’s natural and tranquil surroundings, particularly the forest and field around her farm house—offering up a conversation on the value of, and methods of, survival. engaging in the activity of scavenging, she collected branches from her immediate environment, bringing them back to her workshop and modifying them with her team. focusing on essence and origin, they have combined nature’s organic forms with basic man-made shapes: the circle, square and triangle, to bring ‘civilized primitives’ into physical reality. each of the branches were sanded into a smooth surface, while one was left textured an rough. they were then cast in bronze and arranged to form an extensive furniture series that includes: an A-frame daybed, candleholder, clock, desk, desk light, mirror, floor and table lamp. the pieces of ‘civilized primitives’ maintain the natural elements of the original branches it has been cast from, polished in a such a way that results in a harmonious contrast within a singular object, thanks to the industrial materials from which they have been made.kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ lamp
bronze, anodized aluminium
limited editionkiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ mirror, 2016
26 x 15 x 60 cm
bronze
limited edition

kiki-van-eijk-design-miami-basel-nilufar-gallery-designboom-aaa
‘civilized primitives’ candleholder, 2016
35 x 25 x 90 cm
bronze
limited edition
kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ mirror and candleholder, 2016
kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ clock, 2016
40 x 25 x 95 cm
bronze
limited edition

kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘civilized primitives’ table lamp kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
kiki van eijk reflecting on her ‘civilized primitives’ collection

kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘phyisical interaction’ flint, 2016
85 x 85 x 110 cm
coated steel, patinated brass, 24K gold plated brass, brass

 

 

 

‘phyiscal interaction’ continues to reference primal and natural aspects, and van eijk’s passion for merging low- and high-tech materials and methods. the family of sculptural lighting objects represent three basic elements: earth, wind and fire. wanting to deliver a sense of amusement through the objects, the dutch designer turned to the wonder of a child playing to inform how the lamps could be illuminated. each of the switches are interactive, inviting the user to blow on them to bring them to life, allowing people to experience the works in different ways. for example, once the special dome that characterizes ‘flint’ is lit, the abstract and colorfully hued leaves begin to shine; while when one blows on ‘mobile’, the outlying foliage of the delicate branches start to glimmer. both are dimmed or shut down simply by covering the gold leaf with your hand.

 

kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘physical interaction’ mobile, 2016
85 x 70 x 125 cm
coated steel, patinated brass, 24K gold plated brass, brass

 

 

kiki van eijk on ‘civilized primitives’ and ‘physical interaction’:
these two collections present my latest aspirations – how humans interact with the natural world and how designers have a responsibility to bring this relationship to design.’

kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
when the special dome the characterizes ‘flint’ is lit, the abstract and colorfully hued leaves begin to shine

 

 

 

the installation at design miami/ basel will see ‘civilized primitives’ and ‘physical interaction’ housed within a large-scale tent—an clear reference to nature and the outdoors, particularly nomadism and the improvisation and resourcefulness that comes with this lifestyle. drawing on bedouin-style structures, and modern tent construction systems as influences, kiki van eijk collaborated with experts in large format printing, exposize, to bring the scene to life.

kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
when one blows on ‘mobile’, the outlying foliage of the delicate branches start to glimmer
kiki van eijk design miami basel nilufar gallery designboom
‘mobile’ invites individuals to blow on its leaves to illuminate it

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