MAD arkitekter: mad peleton bicycle stands MAD arkitekter: mad peleton bicycle stands
apr 29, 2013

MAD arkitekter: mad peleton bicycle stands

‘the MAD Peleton’ by MAD arkitekter, bjørvika, norwayimage © kurt singstad

 

 

 

the challenge was extreme: what do you do with an urban space which is 10 x 90 metres in area, with minimal sunlight and a requirement of 200 bicycle parking places? This strip of city floor should give pedestrians (and cyclists!) a pleasant experience and, at the same time, provide a suitable entrance to the commercial areas on ground floor level.

 

the solution was to give the entire strip a bicycle theme. norwegian practice MAD arkitekter created a new bike stand, the ‘MAD Bike.’ these stylized bicycle structures of stainless steel provide safe bicycle parking and simultaneously create an interesting visual and spatial impression. the bicycle lights were an essential factor – we knew that they would give a unique experience and galvanize the concept in this singular urban space. they are arrangedin a pattern that emulates a peloton – a pack of riders in a road bicycle race. tour de bjørvika! the front bike leads the pack in the direction of the fjord while their red and white LED lights accentuate the direction. it proved difficult to find a producer, but tangen maskin in ås had the necessary positive attitude and did a fantastic job. åf lighting was also an invaluable support.

 

 

stainless steel bike racksimage © kurt singstad

 

 

simulating the configuration of a peletonimage © kurt singstad

 

 

white lights emphasize the directionimage © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

leading bikeimage © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

image © kurt singstad

 

 

site

 

 

project info:

 

 

architects/designers: MAD arkitekterlandscape architects: grindaker aslighting consultants: åf lightingproduced by: richard tangen, tangen maskin

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

  • Seriousily, atleast one image with a bicycle attached to the stand would have been nice.

    Aaro says:
  • Where are the real bikes?

    desk says:
  • Great concept. Well done! And, thoughtful photography, but …it would have been nice to see the practical use of the stands with real bikes attached. i.e. Does the installation work? Is it one bike attached per stand or is it two bikes attached per stand?

    Ian says:
  • I’ kept scrolling down looking for that picture of a bike locked to one of those racks, but I was never able to find one!

    Aesthetically magnificent though!

    doneb4 says:
  • Hi,
    thanks for commenting! When I took these photos, the bike racks where brand new, and the housing prosject next to the bikes was still empty. Now, a few weeks later, there are a lot of bikes attched to the stands!

    Kurt says:
  • visually it’s very interesting but, it’s not a enormous rack for a bicycle? something smaller and with less material waste would do the same work…

    tmjf says:
  • That’s really cool! Very creative thinking! I’m only concerned that the light feature will lift the price uneccessarily. And I hope the screws will hold it – tar can flow and I’ve seen many of other constructions ripped out because of the lever. But this does not affekt the idea itself.

    Dirk16 says:
  • Ah, sorry, I forgot: the light feature could be excellent if it was sufficiently bright so one could handle a bike-lock (especially number locks) at night – not all places have bright street lamps. Maybe with just a halfdome of transluzent plastic?

    Dirk16 says:
  • INice done! Great thinking and Photographs!

    atelier argos says:
  • Hi, love the idea!
    Like others I would love to see pictures of the stands in use.
    One concern: is the sopport which is screwed to the ground strong enough? I can imagine people (not only the small ones) playing on the stands, taking pictures.

    Elena Soboleff says:

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