AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand
jul 11, 2014

AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand

AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand
images courtesy AirType

 

 

 

a hardware and machine learning startup based out of austin, texas has developed AirType, a keyboard-less keyboard that allows users to type on virtually any surface, or none at all. fitting in the palm of one’s hand, the ‘AirType’ self-learns finger movements and is accompanied by an app that brings dynamic text prediction and correction to each typing experience. the compact piece of technology also adapts to the way users type, meaning typing habits never need to change. for easy transportation, just clip it onto your tablet, and take it with you everywhere. to learn more, see here.

 

 

video courtesy pfista

AirType keyless bluetooth keyboard fits in the palm of your hand
‘AirType’ self-learns finger movements and is accompanied by an app that dynamically predicts and corrects text

  • Having designed some similar stuff (but a bit better than the one presented here above), I think I have the elements to give some feedback. And the hard thing is to know where to start…. it is so wrong in so many levels. For starters, if we all type in the way those hands are typing in the video, we would not be typing at all. Those fingers don’t press any key related to the text appearing on the top. Is it another language? In which language is it? Any word with 4 k characters? Those hands have no idea what they are pressing….. The video demonstration exemplifies how difficult is to type with no physical reference. And how hard to calibrate it is: no two people move the fingers in the same way. But most importantly: who is “people”? Which people is that? Is there any substantial research to support such a big claim? I did my research….. and the results were quite the opposite: “People” want physical stuff. Thank you.

    Juan Pablo says:

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