markus kayser: solar sinter 3D printer
jun 28, 2011
markus kayser: solar sinter 3D printer


‘solar sinter’, a solar-powered 3D printer by markus kayser, utilizes the abundant desert resources of sun and sand to manufacture products

 

 

 

london-based markus kayser, a masters candidate in design products at the royal college of art, converts the raw resources
of sunlight and sand into glass products with his fully automated, solar-powered ‘solar sinter‘ 3D printer.

 

the device works from the same technique of sintering that is common to most 3D printer processes,
heating a powder (here silicia sand) to its melting point and letting it cool and solidify (here into glass).
‘solar sinter’ utilizes the sun’s rays in place of a laser to selectively heat parts of the sand.
the device moves automatically, positioning itself in proper focus relative to the sun’s rays;
and by continually sweeping new layers of fresh sand over the selectively melted down parts,
kayser builds up a 3-dimensional product.

 

kayser created and tested a manually operated ‘solar sinter’ in february 2011, before producing the fully automated,
computer-driven version depicted here during two weeks of testing in the sahara desert. the machine utilizes replicatorG
opensource software.

 

 


closer view of the device

 

 


detail view


labelled photograph of the machine

 

 

 

kayser notes:
‘in a world increasingly concerned with questions of energy production and raw material shortages, this project explores
the potential of desert manufacturing, where energy and material occur in abundance. the machine represent[s] the initial
significant steps towards what I envisage as a new solar-powered production tool of great potential.

 

‘solar sinter’ can be seen at the royal college of art graduate exhibitions 2011, running now through july 3rd.

 

 


view of the sand being heated to melting by the focused rays of sunight

 

 


a bowl created using ‘solar sinter’

 

 


kayser setting up ‘solar sinter’ for testing in the sahara desert

 

 


documentation of ‘solar sinter’ at work: installing the machine onsite (1:04); the printing process (2:02)

via creativeapplications

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