new york city-based creative agency framlab have proposed a solution to the city’s rising population of homeless people in a series of 3D-printed micro-neighborhoods made up of hexagonal housing modules. these units are designed to connect to a scaffold structure, pack densely, and create a second, active layer of lots alongside an empty wall.

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the front of an imagined cluster creating a cellular urban mosaic

 

 

the ‘homed’ proposal has been created by framlab to provide year-round housing that can withstand harsh, cold weather and provide a cool space during summer. while the exterior is composed of oxidized aluminum cladding, the interior offers a soft and friendly environment.

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
at nighttime the cluster can showcase digital artwork, public information and/or commercial advertisements

 

 

the 3D printed modules capture views of the cityscape outside and can be tailored to the specific needs and desires of its resident. furniture, cabinets and equipment can all be integrated into the minimal space as well as a range of integrated smart technologies that support a safe and comfortable space for the inhabitant. a wide range of units can be created, such as a bedroom with a study nook, a lofted bedroom unit or a bathroom unit with all-in-all allowing a speedy deployment of homed communities who can relocate and expand with changes in the built environment just as fast.

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the interior modules are 3D-printed from recyclable bioplastics, offering an environmentally friendly and cost-effective assembly

 

 

by taking advantage of pre-fabrication technologies, a community of Homed units can be erected in a matter of days. a typical 50 feet x 70 feet wall can host up to 95 units. the interior modules are 3D-printed from recyclable bioplastics, offering an environmentally friendly and cost-effective assembly. whilst the appearance of the modules during the day form an urban mosaic, at night they have been designed to be able to showcase digital artwork, public information and/or commercial advertisements.

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the interior has a range of integrated smart technologies that support a safe and comfortable space for the inhabitant

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
by combining different types of modules, a wide range of units can be created, such as a bedroom with a study nook

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
…or a bathroom unit

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
…or a lofted bedroom unit

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the 3D-printed modules allow furniture, cabinets and equipment to be integrated into the structure,
allowing for a minimal space that does not need additional furnishing and accessories

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the quick deployment of the system allows homed communities to relocate and expand with changes in the built environment

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
as cities densify, traditional (horizontal) vacant lots disappear and vertical ones emerge

 

3d printed micro-neighbourhoods new york city homeless framlab designboom
the backbone of a homed cluster is a scaffolding framework with integrated vertical circulation and in-situ installation capabilities

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: kieron marchese | designboom

  • I don’t foresee any building owners or existing or future tenants being ok with covering the views of multi million dollar apartments with a beehive for homeless people. Cool concept though, much of Japan already lives like this

    Richard Blade says:
  • small question – how are all these levels accessed, there would need to be a complex circulation route between the units and the supporting wall, at each level…? Otherwise beautiful design equity !

    Simon says:
  • Any thoughts about heating/cooling?
    And what about sewage?
    BTW, have the designers ever interviewed any homeless people? Because this proposal is about them, right?

    Delaxos says:
  • Homeless people would build their own stuff if they were allowed and helped to. Satoshi forest is one project where people are actually involved in the thing they are going to live in. I don’t think a project with expensive graphics and plans and wants to get loads of money is going to be very attractive to homeless people who have just had their own constructions burnt down for example, as happens here in Barcelona, by the authorities or just random maniacs. Just change the law and you won’t even need to 3d print anything. They already work to make their stuff and just need freredom to build and to live.

    ale fernandez says:
  • Congrats for this work. Nice concept but difficult manufacturing. Maybe in 15 years you could have an available technology and infrastructure to print it with a reasonable cost, but even with the manufacturing challenge achieved this looks like a luxury product, not a homeless rest place (Who will pay it btw?). Nice choice for Japan citizens or other overpopulated cities like Richard said.

    FJRQ says:

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