bangkok based practice, creative crews, has designed the ahsa farmstay in the maechan district of chiang rai, thailand. in chiang rai, vernacular building techniques are not passed down from generation to the next. this lack of familiarity coupled with the changing socio-cultural landscape has eroded the relationship between traditional buildings and the people living in them. this project aims to examine architecture as the relationship between buildings and culture.

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand
double skin walls for flexible use and activities during the day and added insulation at night

all images courtesy of creative crews ltd.

 

 

the ahsa farmstay project by creative crews addresses this issue through the programme of cultural tourism and the conservation of vernacular architecture for future generations. reclaimed timber from dismantled houses was selected as the main building material and the architect chose to conserve the essence of the original buildings in parts, rather than restoring as a whole.

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand
view from the walk-in closet, hard crafted ceramic washing basin, over looking lush greenery of a freshly planted rice paddy

 

 

extensive documentation of individual pieces was undertaken to minimize construction cost and material wastage. some material has distinctive forms resulting from the previous joinery, which are preserved and celebrated. each mark tells the story of the journey of each piece of timber, where it has been, and how it was used. some details are designed to mimic vernacular construction methods, others are updated and improved upon to ensure structural integrity. ultimately, the ahsa farmstay project allows the architect to demonstrate that vernacular architecture can be updated and made relevant to present day thailand.

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand
the host unit to the left and stairs leading up to guest unit on the right

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand
the main kitchen with traditional northern thai rice storage ‘kapom’

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand

joinery detail; featuring an old column bearing works of a previous incarnation

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand

reclaimed timber

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand

the dining pavilion surrounded by rice paddies

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand
a gravel road leads guests past the local aka community farming, through to the day tour pavilion where cultural exchange between tourist and locals happen

the ahsa farmstay by creative crews uses vernacular building techniques in thailand

the homestay zone amongst lush foliage

 

 

project info:

 

project name: ahsa farmstay

architect: creative crews ltd.

project location: maechan, chiang rai, thailand

completion year: 2018

gross built area: 565 sqm.

photo credits: thitaya tan

client: rung rak chan co., ltd

craftsman team: bundanjai brands

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: lynne myers | designboom

  • Is the word “vernacular” one of the facilitators chosen words or the author of the article?

    As a traditional designer and fabricator of vernacular folk architecture…I can assure the readers that neither concrete nor modern iron bolts and and locking washers with nuts are at all…vernacular in nature!!!

    Why not actually use the vernacular systems for this region? They are well proven over the millenia to work better than the modern modalities…

    Jay C. White Cloud says:

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