alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
 
alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
feb 04, 2014

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast

offering uninterrupted views of the pacific coast, the ‘rayban house’ by alejandro d’acosta flows directly onto its beachfront location. located in mexico, the project emerged after living on the site for a year and getting to know the environmental conditions. the land itself provided many challenges, it is subject to constant winds and intense sun reflections due to its exposed position. the main idea was based on creating an outdoor living space that was able to be habitable throughout the seasons.

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the terrace is protected from the wind by two lateral mounds that are part of the existing topography
all images courtesy of alejandro d’acosta

 

 

the built structure is dug two meters into the ground, burying the bedrooms below with communal areas placed above on the same level as the natural terrain. the outdoor patios enable protection against the wind and privacy from neighboring buildings, as well as the necessary support for the mud and soil system used. constructed mainly from recycled materials, the house incorporates 300 pieces of wooden bridge sequoias from san francisco, clay walls and about 200 railroad ties. 

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the built structure is connected to the natural topographic mounds

 

 

the open plan living, dining and kitchen spaces connect with the terrace deck, which is made with redwood planks and sheltered by two lateral mounds. the landscape design was also developed using recycled, or rescued plants from the trash, using aloes at the main entrance.

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
overview of the the outdoor living spaces that flow directly onto the shoreline

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the house was built using recycled and natural materials

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the landscape design was also developed using recycled or found plants

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
looking past the site towards the surrounding cliffs

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the kitchen has a large wooden table in the center

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the bedrooms are located in the underground part of the building

alejandro d'acosta's rayban house overlooks the pacific coast
the architect at the front door

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

  • Perhaps the infamous “mordida” to help to permitting? Kudos to Mr. Dacosta. His approach on this particular project reminds me of Paolo Soleri’s work in the Arizona desert. A bit strange, a bit ridiculous and yet very much in sink with the vernacular of Baja California and a refreshing modernity. Great stuff!!!

    AR
  • Utterly fabulous. Use of recycled everything, including plants, is the most naturalistic response to the oceans power to recreate everything it comes in contact with. No doubt it will come into contact with Casa Ray Ban, but I suspect Mr. Dacosta will find even more creative building materials gifted from it after the storm. (And what ever magic he used to navigate the permitting process should be bottled.) Adore.

    mkc

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

architecture news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
508,031 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample
designboom magazine