amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins
 
amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins
mar 19, 2012

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

‘roof for molinete roman ruins’ by amann-cánovas-maruri in cartagena, murcia, spain all images courtesy amann-cánovas-maruri image © david frutos

madrid-based architecture practice amann-cánovas-maruri (atxu amann, andrés cánovas, nicolás maruri) has shared with us images of ‘roof for molinete roman ruins’, a new cover protecting an assembly of archaeological thermal baths, forum and domus of molinete park in cartagena, spain. conceived as a transition element between very diverse urban conditions, the light polycarbonate structure seeks to seamlessly integrate the dense city centre to the sloping park while creating a continuous perception of the whole site.

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins exterior view from park image © david frutos

read as a hovering volume that stretches from the edge of the park, the faceted intervention describes a low-lying artificial topography with dynamic angles and faces. the exterior skin is constructed out of perforated steel plates and corrugated polycarbonate sheets to exhibit a uniform but translucent quality to the roof, allowing sunlight to filter through to the archaeological site below. in order to fully respect the roman remains, the design achieves a large span with limited structural stilts.

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins view of ruins image © david frutos

to allow for a fully immersive observation of the roman assembly, the design offers an elevated walkway which runs parallel to the street of the city. the light steel beam structure provides an overall view of the archaeological remains from three meters high. subtly shifting in its route, the fully accessible path generates a new urban facade through coloured partition walls.

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins underneath roof image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins from elevated pathway image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins stairs to elevated route image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins at night image © david frutos

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins during construction

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins model

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins 3D model

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins rendered aerial view

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins rendered approach

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins site plan

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins ruins plan

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins roof plan

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins longitudinal section

amann cánovas maruri: roof for molinete roman ruins front elevation

project info:

architects: atxu amann, andrés cánovas, nicolás maruri team: nacho álvarez-monteserín, javier gutiérrez, ana lópez, pablo sigüenza, josé lópez promoter: cartagena puerto de culturas quantity surveyor: rafael checa construction: TMR client: cartagena puerto de culturas construction surveyor: andrés canovas and nicolás maruri structure: josé cerezo ingeniería SL

  • The ruins aren’t much to look at…really just a collection of small walls…so the roof becomes the main event, a way of attracting people to the archaeology as well as protecting it. Clever.

    SB
  • perfect!

    robert777
  • Maybe if it was more opaque ? Like a real “earthquake-like” scenario (see “renderd areal view” picture) : It has a massive concept I think (pieces of earth teared apart or splitted), but yet it has to let daylight pass through to the ruins. OK, that’s not easy 🙂 But maybe this can be a reason why the primary concept has lost some of its strength (and why the people here do not seem to appreciate the result).

    Stephane
  • the roof protects the history and the path makes the site accessible for all people and visitors….i think thats the point.

    just sayin
  • Agree with all the statments above, whats the point?

    Shara Johannesburg
  • not historically respectfull, neither nice

    juliano
  • yes, all of the above.

    wpgmb
  • far too heavy

    ben
  • the roof takes all of the attention – what’s the point? should have been much more minimalist and clean. bad design judgement.

    EA Berlin
  • distracting

    dbkii

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