‘canadian museum for human rights’ by antoine predock architects, winnipeg, canadaimage © josel catindoy

 

 

already a impressive marker on winnipeg’s skyline, the antoine predock-designed ‘canadian museum for human rights‘ is close to completion and slated to be a revitalizing force for the city. characterized by a 5000 square meter ‘glass cloud’ the museum is a monumental endeavor dedicated to exhibiting the commonalities and histories of humankind. formally, the building seeks to manifest a symbolic apparition of ice, clouds and stone, all set in a landscape of greenery. the architecture is carved into the earth and dematerializes into reflections of the sky, while interiors are designed to recreate a metaphorical journey through life.

 

the museum will be inaugurated in early 2014.

 

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

the nearly completed museum in the winter landscape image © flavia fernandez fabio image courtesy of canadian museum for human rights

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

the shape is informed by the wings of a doveimage © aaron cohenimage courtesy of canadian museum for human rights

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

alabaster walkways connect exhibit spaces image © aaron cohenimage courtesy of canadian museum for human rights

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

(left): interior view of the structural towerimage courtesy of antoine predock architect(right): view of the alabaster-clad network of pathways that connects exhibit spaces image © aaron cohenimage courtesy of canadian museum for human rights

 

 

 

in the historic site where the red and assiniboine rivers meet is an architecture that draws from the forms of the earth to express the basic tenets of humankind. a grand glass cloud based on abstracted wings of a dove envelops roots of tyndall limestone that create a base for prairie-grass filled slope containing a diversity of museum programming; among them a 350-seat amphitheater carved into steps for 450 million year old stone. the interior great hall is washed in daylight from the 1650 individual pieces of glazing that clad the curved glass facade. additionally, the 23 storey structure takes into account the province’s weather extremes in the design, using 334 custon cut panes of fritted glass to keep the interior temperature comfortable in an environmentally friendly way while reducing glare. local limestone further serves to balance the expanses of glass while becoming a mountainous walkway. visitors can view the permanent exhibitions in the space, then enjoy the sights of the esplanade riel and saint-boniface on aspacious terrace. the airy space is topped by the ‘tower of hope’ meant to materialize the heart of the museum and become a beacon of its ideals. within the illuminated 328 foot tower, a spiral staircase leads to a viewing platform; however, the museum is reportedly the most inclusive design in canadian history, far surpassing smithsonian guidelines for accessibility and thereby setting a global standard. the museum worked with the inclusive design research centre and the ontario college of art and design to develop interface/input devices for touch screens and kiosk-based exhibits. the human-centered museum prioritized accessibility and used the latest research from the disability community so as to ensure that the range of visitors can enjoy the first museum solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights in canada.

 

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

in process view image courtesy of the canadian museum for human rights

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

the building already characterizes the prairie city skylineimage © aaron cohenimage courtesy of canadian museum for human rights

 

 

antoine predock architects: canadian museum for human rights, winnipeg

view of the museum in the snowy landscape, flanked by provencher’s bridgeimage © aaron cohenimage courtesy of canadian museum for human rights