loading video...

EKAR architects builds a house in thailand for a monk to walk in meditation

a walking oasis for a monk

 

EKAR Architects presents its Walk House as a tranquil oasis, an extension of the Wat Thammayan temple in Petchabun, Thailand. The project is surrounded by trees and mountains, and takes shape as a living space for an abbot, the head of an abbey of monks. Along with typical sleeping and living areas, the architecture is programmed with spaces dedicated to a daily ritual practiced together with other monks — a walking meditation.

 

The team tells designboom: ‘Instead of designing a traditional house, a key concept of walking meditation which is a concentration on the present dimensions of earth and sky to enhance awareness of mental and physical states, was reinterpreted in the architectural context.’

ekar architects walk houseimages by Ekaphap Duangkaew

 

 

The sloping rooftop and mountain beyond

 

EKAR Architects (see more here) organizes its Walk House as a long corridor, facing the East to receive the gentle morning sunlight, regarding the big landscape of this faraway temple. This continuous space stretches 59 meters (194 feet) and is enclosed by a single sloping rooftop, whose graceful curvature follows the contour of the mountain beyond. The team continues: ‘The space below and above the roof is designed to accommodate and support the daily practices, including walking.

ekar architects walk house

 

 

a humble space by ekar architects

 

The team at EKAR Architects perforates a section of the sloping roof of the Walk House so that lush trees are allowed to grow through. Here, sunlight and rain passes through, while the roof’s curving surface helps channel the rainwater flow toward one end of the space, as the architects note: ‘imitating a natural water flow on the mountain.’

 

The group continues: ‘Under the bended roof; the lowest ceiling space, there are different functional areas for the abbot; including sleeping area, working area and praying area. The interior space is compact which is the attempt to compromise the nature of Buddhism — humbleness, in the place.

 

‘The long continuous path, that also follows the natural contours, makes a gentle slope for a comfortable walk. Step, flat and curve are the elements featured in the path, together with different simple materials; such as paving blocks, mosaic tiles, earth and grass. Allowing monks to walk barefoot and to feel differences. The objective of the Walk House is to offer no boundary for monks to meditate by walking, with a hope to enhance their ritual practice – anywhere.’

ekar architects walk house ekar architects walk house ekar architects walk house

EKAR-architects-walk-house-petchabun-thailand-designboom-06a

ekar architects walk house

EKAR-architects-walk-house-petchabun-thailand-designboom-08a

 

1/13
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 

project info:

 

project title: WALK / HOUSE

architecture: EKAR Architects | @EKAR_Architects

location: Tambol Na Chalieng, Aumphoe Nhongpai, Petchabun, Thailand

owner: Dhammayan Temple
completion: July 2020

photography: Ekaphap Duangkaew

lead architect: Ekaphap Duangkaew
landscape architect: Groundsplay (Athipat Ae-uam, Pacharee Sophonphaisit)
project director: Thaywin Wannabamroong
structural engineer: Pimol Nontalee
construction drawing: Saranyu Kamphukaew
designer assistant: Saranyu Kamphukaew
contractor: V-Sathapat

KEEP UP WITH OUR DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSLETTERS
suscribe on designboom
- see sample
- see sample
suscribe on designboom

happening now! on its 35th participation at salone del mobile, pedrali unveiled eleven new collections for indoor and outdoor spaces, including brand new collections and extensions of existing collections! 

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

designboom will always be there for you

milan, new york, beijing, tokyo,  since 1999
X
5