this 'folly' desert retreat is designed for the contemporary traveler looking to live off the grid
 

this 'folly' desert retreat is designed for the contemporary traveler looking to live off the grid

cohesion studio recognizes the contemporary need for disconnect. their folly — a retreat in the mojave desert of california — offers the opportunity for seclusion while inciting visitors to reconnect with the natural environment. designer malek alqadi at cohesion defines the architectural folly as a ‘whimsical structure built to serve as a conversation piece, lend interest to a view and experience.’ as the studio aims to explore an integration of pragmatic and contextual relevancy, the retreat is both architecturally innovative and environmentally conscious. the image of the buildings respects the endless desert vista while their ‘solar tree’ exploits the desert’s resources making the folly entirely self-sustainable. the inventive decisions made during the design of this refuge emphasize the beauty of the site and provoke an experiential connection to the mojave desert.

this 'folly' desert retreat is designed for the contemporary traveler looking to live off the grid
all images by sam frost

 

 

cohesion studio’s folly is located just outside the entrance of joshua tree national park in southern california. with the ‘solar tree,’ grey water system, and solar powered ventilating skylights, the project takes advantage of its context with modern technology. the retreat does, however, ‘respectfully exploit’ its surroundings with spatial moments as well. the semi-outdoor ‘stargazing portal’ — a bedroom with no ceiling — invites guests to sleep under the dramatically starry night sky of the mojave desert. an exposed shower with endless views emphasizes the isolation of the project. 

folly desert cohesion

 

 

designer malek alqadi illustrates:folly is a prototype that is currently expanding into folly farm in the hamptons and folly mojave in southern california. both off-grid destinations will allow for inclusive experiences such as work retreats, social groups, or intimate events. utilizing architecture as a medium, this collection of work will provide moments of disconnect in which guests can experience a creative escape to engage with fellow explorers or simply relax with alone time.‘ visitors can submit photos from their stay to the folly instagram page @folly.folly.folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

folly desert cohesion

  • Like all eye appeal architecture it must pass the sniff-test, it has passed the “form” test but lacks the “function test”, Carl is right, to test function theory spend a whole 120+ summer in the desert, off grid & let that fully-functional metal frame bake your brain, it won’t cool off till way in the early morning if then. Just sayin.

    Robert Roy
  • Typical comment of someone who has nothing to say architecturally or otherwise!
    If you are an architect Carl, surely you can find something positive or intelligent, or say nothing at all.
    The concept is indeed intelligent, simple, to the point offering good solution in it’s simplicity. Squeezed into an incredible small foot print the design offers 2 brm or more / 1 bath + a (genius) outdoor shower / dipping pool (I would recommend a sunshade, perhaps the “solar tree”) combined with the pool. + evaporative coolers combined with the skylights, operable when temp. is above (say) 85 deg. F. Space heating w/ wood burning fire pl. as you show it. LED low voltage lights (as you have it and) once it becomes a project a central (small capacity) power plant to feed the kitchen appliances, car charging connections to get (net zero and emergency + fire sprinkler service. Roof insulation inside of the Cor-Ten metal panels is a simple design issue.
    A tremendous job Malek, you have a long way to go (leave the Carl’s dumb comments in the dust). Arpad Chabafy Architect / Tustin, CA.

    Arpad Chabafy
  • Frankly, there is enough development “outside of Joshua tree national park”, which is a very fragile ecosystem.
    It would be better for the world if this didn’t exist.
    Also, good luck with that metal facade when its 120 degrees F (49c) outside.

    Carl

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