naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita
 
naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita
jun 16, 2012

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita

‘house in suita’ by naoko horibe architect’s office, suita-shi, japan image © kaori ichikawa all images courtesy of naoko horibe architect’s office

 

 

 

overlooking a residential street in suita-shi, japan, the ‘house in suita’ by tokyo-based naoko horibe architect’s office borrows scenery from a nearby 50-year old cherry tree. two glass cubes open the corners of the dwelling, one offering a panoramic view towards the leafy canopy positioned to the north of the structure. smaller in size, the other takes into account a high retaining wall to the south of the sloping site by minimizing exposure to the home’s lowest level. the gradually graded lawn and curved concrete stairway form a comfortable approach to the front door.

 

prioritizing convenience, the functional areas including the entry, kitchen, dining room and studio are placed within the more enclosed ground floor. a stairway of wooden treads leads to the spacious living room on the first floor. protected with walls, an open-air courtyard may be accessed from the TV room and master bedroom. lined with a wood ledge, the north-facing corner glazing introduces warm sunlight through the continuous common area.

 

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita view of house from the 50-year old cherry tree image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita site is bordered by a retaining wall to the south image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita ground level dining area is designed for convenience image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita view of kitchen from the dining area image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita view of stairs and dining area from the first floor image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita north-facing window image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita view from the living room image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita living room image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita living room + balcony beyond image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita TV area + balcony image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita bedroom image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita washroom + lavatory image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita illuminated at night image © kaori ichikawa

 

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita floor plan / level 0 1. entrance 2. dining & kitchen    3. atelier 4. washroom & lavatory 5. bathroom 6. walk-in closet 7. shoe closet 8. lavatory 9. car parking space

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita floor plan / level 1 10. living room 11. child’s bedroom 12. library 13. master bedroom 14. balcony

naoko horibe architect’s office: house in suita section

project info:

design to completion: march 2010-july 2010 location: suita-shi, osaka primary usage: residence structure: steel-frame construction, two stories above ground family structure: couple with two children site area: 199.31 m2 building area: 69.01 m2 total floor space: 112.74 m2 architect: naoko horibe photographer: kaori ichikawa

  • I guess you need to look around the neighbourhood at the other (typical) japanese houses and yards to apreciate the difference. A typical tract house on that lot would be fronted by a blank retaining wall, there would be no lawn or greenery whatsoever, and the house would be completely closed to the street, windows covered by screens, without taking advantage of views or access to light. The canted wall makes room for access to the back yard.
    As for the big unsupported corner window, it really is quite easy. You just need to think outside the box! Just because you can’t see the support doesn’t mean it isn’t there.

    Gordon
  • It is nice enough inside, but outside – boring. In typical architecture speak the description means nothing. Its a boring cube with slightly interesting windows and a lousy yard.

    homesower
  • help– poor Rocha is lost

    wwwillem
  • how the hell they made the structure so they can pull it off the windows in the corners???, in the floor plan shows that the celling is floating!

    Rodrigo Rocha
  • Very Striking!
    I was happy to find this because I was looking for ideas for a new url=http://www.juliesxstitch.com] cross stitch design [/url] studio and this gave me many great ideas!
    -Julie

    Julie

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

architecture news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
508,146 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample
designboom magazine