KEI SASAKI / INTERMEDIA steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki
 

KEI SASAKI / INTERMEDIA steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki

situated within the japanese city of nagasaki, KEI SASAKI / INTERMEDIA has designed the ‘atago nursery‘. the project – conceived for approximately 140 kids between the ages of 0 and 6 – is based on the client’s request of creating organically-shaped spaces, better suiting children’s imagination and allowing them to play freely. in keeping with this concept, the architect decided to form a building which embraces the natural slope of the site, rather than employing costly and intrusive excavations to create a flat level.

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the main entrance hall

all images © kai nakamura

 

 

upon entering the nursery at the street level entrance, kids are greeted by a large staircase to ascend to the various levels. this space, which is filled with natural light and supported by slim columns, appears to resemble the forest which can be seen behind. the plan by KEI SASAKIINTERMEDIA forms a sort of curved spine, with the seven children’s rooms on the upper floor tracing the shape of the site and resulting in naturally-shaped spaces to match the terrain. within these areas, the rib-structure, which functions as both columns and beams, is expressed as curved arches, further adding to the idea of an organic architecture.

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the main staircase is filled with an abundance of natural light

 

 

with the stepped architecture that has been generated, impressive views are gained out over the cityscape of nagasaki. from the children’s rooms, access can be made directly to a large playground area, forming a dialogue between the indoors and outdoors and stimulating a connection to nature. to achieve the structural stability that is required with a sloping site, the rear elevation on the ground level of the building is formed as a retaining wall. rather than imposing a rectilinear box, KEI SASAKI / INTERMEDIA instead decided to harness the natural topography of the location, resulting in a nursery that aims to provide the optimum space for a child’s development and enjoyment.

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the interior spaces connect to the outdoors

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the children of the nursery enjoying the space

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

view from the top of the staircase

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the children’s room

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

view of the interior space with the organic-shaped structure

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

the rooms connect to an outdoor playground area

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom

view over the playground

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom
the nursery viewed from the street

KEI SASAKI steps the atago nursery to the sloped terrain of nagasaki designboom
view from the playground at sunset

 

 

project info:

 

project name: ‘atago nursery’

project type: nursery

location: nagasaki city, nagasaki, japan

architect: KEI SASAKI / INTERMEDIA

structural design: mika araki / jun sato structural engineer co.ltd

equipment design: seed design engineer co.ltd

lighting plan: LIGHT・PLAN

photography: kai nakamura

project year: 2016

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: lynne myers | designboom

  • Not a single child or parent or staff member or visitor will be using a wheeled device or crutches??? There is a ramp or elevator that is not shown in the article, I presume?

    C Adams says:

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