kotaro horiuchi disorients visitors with membranes in japan
photo © issei mori
all images courtesy of kotaro horiuchi architecture

 

 

 

‘fusionner 1.0: hole of droplets floating’ is an installation created by kotaro horiuchi architecture in nagoya, japan. situated within the confines of a simple rectilinear room, the exhibition features a set of two floating ‘membranes’ dividing the vertical height into three sections. from the entrance, the layers begin to slope upwards while remaining parallel to one another, allowing visitors of all ages to interact in new ways of spatial differentiation. circulation invites them to move from hole to hole, emphasizing moments intimate closeness or distant separation, where they must observe their new environment. the perforations of all sizes are meant to obscure borders, while lights project fluctuating colors onto the swaying sheets to overall disorient inhabitants.

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
architectural models are randomly dispersed throughout the installation 
photo © issei mori

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
perforations of different sizes suggest different gathering spaces and amounts of mobility

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
the angles of the membranes obscure views of other visitors

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
the use of simple white sheets adds a smooth, tactile element to the project
photo © mitsuru narihara

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
lights placed throughout the space provide different hues for the inhabitants
photo © issei mori

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
chairs add allow adults to interact with some of the other visitors
photo © issei mori

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
photo © mitsuru narihara

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
the work is a play on the spatial qualities that can be developed through noble materials

kotaro horiuchi fusionner membranes japan
view of the space from the entrance
photo © mitsuru narihara 

 

 

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