lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
 

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home

the collaborative efforts of lily jencks and nathanael dorent have transformed a set of stone ruins in scotland into a contemporary and environmentally friendly country home. in repurposing the original structure — the remains of an old farmhouse — the design team has created a property that affords sweeping views across the region’s picturesque, undulating landscape. ‘located in a remote countryside area, this project was conceived as passive and self-sufficient, well-insulated and using solar energy,’ explain the architects.

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
all images © sergio pirrone

 

 

as the original farmhouse had been modified on a number of occasions since its construction, lily jencks studio and nathanael dorent architecture carefully selected a sequence of materials and geometries that would highlight its storied history. ‘the first layer is the existing stone wall, within which sits a black waterproofing EPDM rubber clad pitched-roof ‘envelope’, and within that a curvilinear interior ‘tube’ wall system,’ says the design team. ‘this interior curved surface is made of insulating polystyrene blocks within a gridded wood structure, and is covered with glass reinforced plastic.’

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
a set of stone ruins has been turned into a contemporary country home

 

 

the different layers serve two main purposes: they emphasize the narrative of time, while reflecting a variety of architectural expressions. ‘these three layers are not designed as independent parts, rather, they take on meaning as their relationship evolves through the building’s sections,’ the architects continue. ‘they separate, come together, and intertwine, creating a series of architectural singularities, including in some areas a particularly revealing simultaneous reading of these three layers.’

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the design team preserved the existing ruin walls

 

 

the house’s more public programs, including the kitchen and dining areas, are contained within the ‘tube’, while private areas, (including bedrooms, and bathrooms), are found at each end of the property. the home’s windows and doors are positioned in response to the the structure’s existing walls, as well as the views from the site. ‘at the windows and doors the tube funnels out towards the light, creating a ‘poched’ space within the thickness of the tube wall, and between the envelope and the tube, that can be used for furniture and storage,’ explains the design team.

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the house’s public programs, including the kitchen, are contained within the central ‘tube’

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the home’s windows and doors are positioned in response to the the structure’s existing walls

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
more private areas are found at each end of the property

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the architects reinstituted the pitched roof that would have been there originally

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the house is located in a remote countryside area

lily jencks + nathanael dorent transform 17th century ruins into contemporary country home
the dwelling affords sweeping views across the region’s picturesque, undulating landscape

 

 

project info:

 

design team: lily jencks studio [lily jencks (director) + pati santos (architect)] and nathanael dorent architecture
executive architect: savills [michael leybourne (architect) + allan lees]
structural engineering: manja van de worp (nous engineering)
program: private house
location: dumfries, scotland
area: 180 sqm
year: 2014-2016
photography: sergio pirrone

  • Lovely project …

    Leonardo Sideri
  • I love the concept, exterior materials, and the exterior. Perfect setting. The interior is too ‘1950’s future’ to my taste.

    Jim

    JimCan

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