ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture
 

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture

ryuichi ashizawa architect & associates has built an extension building for a factory on a landfill site adjacent to the jungle in johor, malaysia. aiming towards a sustainable, low carbon type environment, the building uses the abundant rainwater of the rainforest region, as well as the sunlight, wind, geothermal energy, and green power, in order to function. 

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culturefactory main entrance
all images by kaori ichikawa

 

 

the project by ryuichi ashizawa architect & associates follows a respectful approach towards the site and existing flora and fauna, while the building integrates with the surrounding environment by effectively utilizing natural elements. the green-roof works as an insulation layer between the inetrior and the hot malaysian weather, while also collecting rainwater. natural ventilation is carried through the main tower to the lower spaces by temperature and pressure gradients, allowing a continuous air flow that improves the thermal conditions.

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture
bird eye view

 

 

the building is organized in two main volumes: a plain clear space with an open layout that contains the production area, and an elliptically shaped tower for the administrative and management departments. the long tower axis is directed towards east-west, in order to minimize the influence of solar radiation on the outer wall surface, while a system of wires and vines forms a natural shield.

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture
exterior view

 

 

since the factory staff comprises a considerable number of migrant workers from islamic faith, the design aims to honour their cultural background. the production area is structurally arranged as a forest of hexagonal pillars with star shaped capitals, resembling the arabesque patterns from islamic culture, while the layout mimics the surrounding jungle. rainwater collected from the green roof is channelled into an underground water storage tank through pipes embedded in the pillars, used for plant watering. blowing winds, and water flowing into the pond, together bring a cool breeze to the transitional space between the exterior and the interior.

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture
exterior view

 

 

reflection panels reduce the artificial lighting as much as possible, the factory is designed to maximize the use of natural light, while shielding the spaces from direct solar radiation. guided by computer simulations, the required amount of reflected and diffused daylight was calculated and is controlled by reflection panels that again feature arabesque patterns. 

ryuichi ashizawa's sustainable factory tower in malaysia references islamic culture
pavilion exterior view

 

factory in the earth 6
pavilion interior view

 

factory in the earth 7
islamic patterns on light diffuser plates

 

factory in the earth 8
corridor view

 

factory in the earth 9
canteen view

 

factory in the earth 10
slab

 

factory in the earth 11

 

factory in the earth 12
dining room

 

 

 

project info:

 

name: factory in the earth

designer: RAA | ryuichi ashizawa architect & associates

location: johor bahru, malaysia

 

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: myrto katsikopoulou | designboom

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