STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india
 

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

architectural practice, STO.M.P, has designed ‘house in a grove’ situated in thiruppathur, in the chettinad region of indiathe architects were challenged with the client’s desire of creating a house with a contemporary aesthetic while combining the cultural essence of the local area. the resulting design therefore incorporates an earthy palette of materials, forming a building that complements the traditional architecture and context of chettinad. 

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india
images courtesy of STO.M.P

 

 

to combat solar radiation and facilitate cross ventilation, the architects developed a façade of terracotta ‘jaalis’, that thermally insulates and keeps spaces ventilated with natural light. skylights are also employed in the design to engage the interiors in a constant play of light and shadow. the lounge on the first-floor benefits especially from this display of natural light, resulting in an enhanced spatial experience.

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

view of the garden and fishpond

 

 

the light and shadow configurations are further complemented by the rustic finishes used throughout the house. exposed concrete is used on the ceilings, marble plaster on the walls and the floors are a mix of natural wood, jaisalmer and kota marbles and athangudi tiles. athangudi tiles are manufactured from a village that has lent its name to the handmade cement tiles, which have been a part of the chettinad legacy since the british era.

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

morning view

 

 

while the decision to use athangudi tiles is to incorporate a slice of the chettinad heritage, the core intent is to procure materials from within a 50-kilometer radius of the site. even the terracotta pots used in the filler slabs were made with soil excavated from the site. similarly, deteriorated trees on site were cut and its wood was used for concrete shuttering. this way, the house sits well within the context, resulting in an architecture that is relevant to the local culture.

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

the threshold defined by rubble stone steps

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

detail of the terracotta façade

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

marble plastered composite door

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india
view of the skylights

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

the play of light in the lounge area

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

the living space provides a supple juxtaposition of natural materials

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

the interior is decorated in subtle tones

STO.M.P applies terracotta façade and earthy materials to 'house in a grove' in india

the project uses an earthy material palette

 

 

project info:

 

project name: ‘house in a grove’

project location: thiruppathur, chettinad, india

architecture: STO.M.P (studio for modernism & practical aesthetics)

design team: vignesh sekar team: sekar, balaji pandiyan, shoba sekar, shamini lakshmanan

gross built area: 3929 ft2 (365 m2)

completion year: 2018

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: lynne myers | designboom

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy
LOG IN
designboom's comment policy guidelines
generally speaking, if we publish something, it's because we're genuinely interested in the subject. we hope you'll share this interest and if you know even more about it, please share! our goal in the discussion threads is to have good conversation and we prefer constructive opinions. we and our readers have fun with entertaining ones. designboom welcomes alerts about typos, incorrect names, and the like.
the correction is at the discretion of the post editor and may not happen immediately.

what if you disagree with what we or another commenter has to say?
let's hear it! but please understand that offensive, inappropriate, or just plain annoying comments may be deleted or shortened.

- please do not make racist, sexist, anti-semitic, homophobic or otherwise offensive comments.
- please don't personally insult the writers or your fellow commenters.
- please avoid using offensive words, replacing a few letters with asterisks is not a valid workaround.
- please don't include your website or e-mail address in your comments for the purpose of self-promotion.
- please respect jury verdicts and do not discuss offensively on the competition results
(there is only one fist prize, and designboom usually asks renown professionals to help us to promote talent.
in addition to the awarded designs, we do feel that almost all deserve our attention, that is why we publish
the best 100-200 entries too.)

a link is allowed in comments as long as they add value in the form of information, images, humor, etc. (links to the front page of your personal blog or website are not okay). unwelcome links (to commercial products or services of others, offensive material etc. ) will be redacted. and, ... yes, spam gets banned. no, we do not post fake comments.

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

architecture news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
489,293 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample