greg lynn reimagines detroit car factory at venice biennale using microsoft hololens greg lynn reimagines detroit car factory at venice biennale using microsoft hololens
may 29, 2016

greg lynn reimagines detroit car factory at venice biennale using microsoft hololens

greg lynn reimagines detroit car factory at venice biennale using microsoft hololens
all images courtesy of microsoft hololens

 

 

 

architect greg lynn has used technology developed by microsoft and trimble to redesign the packard plant — a historic, abandoned automobile factory in detroit. presented inside the US pavilion at the 2016 venice architecture biennale, the project is titled ‘the center for fulfillment, knowledge and innovation’, and integrates a range of different programs. the new plant design incorporates innovations in robotic manufacturing, autonomous transportation and online retail.

 

video courtesy of microsoft

 

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
greg lynn has used technology developed by microsoft and trimble to redesign a former car factory

 

 

 

using microsoft hololens and trimble technology, lynn was able to experience his 3D models as holograms placed in the real world. the technology enabled the architect to quickly analyze various scenarios in the context of the physical environment, consequently shortening the design cycle. ‘trimble mixed-reality technology and microsoft hololens bring the design to life and bridge the gap between the digital and physical,’ explained greg lynn. ‘using this technology I can make decisions at the moment of inception, shorten the design cycle and improve communication with my clients.’

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the scheme is presented inside the US pavilion at the 2016 venice architecture biennale

 

 

 

the redesigned complex prioritizes flow, movement and processing through an interconnected network of products, people, robots, and ideas. the first two storeys host inventory including an online retail fulfillment center, a food port, an autonomous livery-car depot and an aerial-drone port. the uppermost level consists of corporate research centers as well as an auditorium/convention center.

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the project is titled ‘the center for fulfillment, knowledge and innovation’

 

 

 

the entire complex is anchored by two five-storey university satellite buildings. these structures are connected on the fourth level by a walkway that supports a series of collaboration spaces, which can be moved and docked adjacent to research and conference centers seasonally. a 1.7 mile-long highway for drones links the site’s 25 existing elevator cores, creating an efficient route for the movement of goods, equipment, and materials. 

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the design incorporates innovations in robotic manufacturing and autonomous transportation

 

 

 

for more images, follow designboom on our dedicated instagram account @venice.architecture.biennale

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
lynn was able to experience his 3D models as holograms placed in the real world

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the technology enabled the architect to quickly analyze various design scenarios

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the redesigned complex prioritizes flow, movement and processing

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image © designboom

venice architecture biennale greg lynn
the site in question — the abandoned packard automobile factory in detroit.

 

 

 

originally commissioned in 1903, the historic packard plant stretches eight blocks along concorde avenue on detroit’s east side. the complex was designed by albert kahn using a new structural system of reinforced-concrete beams, which allowed for unprecedent spans and tall windows. abandoned in 1956, the decayed complex depressed the property values of the surrounding neighborhood, where many blighted homes have been demolished. yet many of the original buildings remain so structurally sound that their total demolition is cost prohibitive.

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