diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
 

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks

on artist and embroider diana yevtukh’s contemplative and long walks through nature, she began to think about the often overlooked empty spaces in the bark of the trees, which she noticed every day. those occasional spots, where the trunk is left bare, are formed from fallen bark that resulted from its growth process, insect damage, or disease. yevtukh started thinking about these spots as ‘scars’, and found these voids to be a place of emptiness within which to make an artistic statement. ‘I felt strongly that this gap on the trunk has to be filled with something,’ she says. ‘I started to reminisce a gaze, and it felt like if it was coming from the soul of the tree.’

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
remedying the wounded heart of nature

 

 

with the arrival of spring, yevtukh began thinking about giving life back to these forgotten spaces through her embroidered artwork. carefully stitching colorful blooms, floral formations, human eyes and hands, the artist canvassed the empty areas in the trees with vibrant and intricately-formed compositions. ‘kids and adults, animals and plants, we all are part of the nature in my understanding’, yevtukh continues, ‘the never-ending suffering wounds the heart and the soul of the nature. but our superpower, as humans, is that we can heal and cherish the life around us. this embroidery is a call to treat the living with love, and not cruelty, to heal the wounds and cease the violence.’

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
remedying the wounded heart of nature (detail) 

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
life is breaking out of the mysterious hideaways

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
life is breaking out of the mysterious hideaways (detail)

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
stitch by stitch cracked and forgotten wall blossoms with a new life

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
stitch by stitch cracked and forgotten wall blossoms with a new life

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
multitudes of life hidden in the plain sight

diana yevtukh 'heals' scarred trees with intricate embroidered artworks
multitudes of life hidden in the plain sight (detail)

  • This is not about the tree’s well-being, it’s about the artist’s ego. Putting fabric – which holds moisture and can protect fungal growth – does not “heal” the tree, it exposes the healed tree to greater risk.

    A scar is where the tree has healed itself. LET MOTHER NATURE DO WHAT SHE DOES BEST.

    Lee Rowan
  • I wish people would stop imposing on nature. There needs to be places where we can go, or not go and just let be, where we have left no trace. As mentioned above, these gaudy blights on the trees will only accelerate disease.

    Lluc
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