eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
 
eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
dec 27, 2013

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
all images courtesy of eliza bennett

 

 

 

using her own skin as a canvas, british artist eliza bennett has realized a self-inflicted sculpture, woven into the palm of her hand. considering the flesh as a base material, bennett carefully stitches patterns and lines into the epidermis of her body using colored thread; ‘a woman’s work is never done’ results as an incredibly worn-looking hand, overworked and fatigued. by using intricate embroidery techniques — traditionally used to symbolize femininity — and applying it to a context of its opposite, bennett challenges the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. ‘through a personally charged perception, I explore a range of issues relating to the formlessness of both individual and social reality’, the artist says of her ephemeral sculpture’s significance. the administered piece on the surface of her skin aims to chronicle the effects of labor intensive work, while drawing attention to low paid jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all of which are traditionally considered to be gender specific towards women.

 

 

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
a detail of the weaving applied to her skin

 

 

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
a close-up of thread carefully sewn into the palm of the artist’s hand

 

 

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
cross-stitched thread into the hand

 

 

eliza bennett embroiders a self-inflicted sculpture into her flesh
the process of weaving thread into her skin

  • I discovered skin embroidry through a French web wool magazine I had subscribed to. Not only do I find this revolting but looking at the magazine is (was now) a special time for my little 4 years old boy. They did not warn about this “art” and we received the images without warning – now, your “art” is giving him nightmares!
    Am I upser? YOU BET I AM! If this gives nightmare to a little boy, it is certainely NO ART!

    Doridar
  • Very effective. It is not very painful to do this sort of thing but of course it comes as a shock. Head then kicks in with judgements and how these go depends on how open a person is to something out of the ordinary. To those of us that can cope with the shock we can be curious about the what and why as well as the artists point of view. For others the discomfort is to great and revulsion and negativity take hold. I guess there are many shades of view between those responses. The Internet of course adds in the element where some passers by have their own form of expression which is trolling. A troll by definition never breaks from their point of view and this can be frustrating but ends up with the engager adopting the similar attitude but directed against the troll. The art of life I guess.

    Frank A
  • It’s really interesting to me that so many people react to this with disgust. Of all the ways people harm themselves, through abusing substances, remaining in abusive relationships, unnecessary surgeries, etc- this is really mild in comparison. And the discomfort in creating the art, IS the art.

    I think these comments are a reflection of people, and how they react to something extremely different and beautiful with hatred and revulsion.

    maddiebabble
  • Well going by comments alone I believe that eliza bennett has evoked enough emotional response that there is no way that this could not be considered art. The natural human response (which is evident) towards self mutilation brings more depth and awareness to the subject matter. Well done Eliza, stand by your convictions!

    MN
  • This is another kind of art-concept but work with a similar technic…

    David Catà spanish artist in 2011

    http://davidcata.com/cimientos/

    See his work in this video
    https://vimeo.com/81201747

    Senén
  • interesting that most male responses are negative and female responses are positive.
    I’m very interested in this work and where it can be taken to literally or not – it’s a living sculpture. Does the artist carry this with her for some time and will she add to other parts i.e. the feet? how will it wear out?
    Obviously there are links to indian henna of the hands but it also seems to connote imprisonment with the net like structure.

    dominic
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