isabelle daeron reclaims scrap paper to make rolled ishihara tapestries

all images courtesy of isabelle daeron

 

 

 

isabelle daëron has designed the ‘ishihara’ tapestries as an exploration into the ways in which reclaimed waste and scraps can have an alternative purpose. small, tight rolls of colorful paper are worked into circular and rectangular rug formations — a principle which offers a resistance to compression. an infinite number of motifs can be generated depending on the available scraps and color range, creating various graphic compositions, both figurative and abstract.

 

the project references ‘ishihara’, the visual test designed to determine color blindness by displaying images of discs composed of tiny dots. at close range, the intricate craftsmanship made by individually rolled paper pieces becomes apparent, but from a distance — or when placed on the ground — colorful, geometric compositions become clear.

isabelle daeron ishihara
the tapestries are an exploration into the ways in which reclaimed waste can be used

isabelle daeron ishihara
small, tight rolls of colorful paper are worked into rug formations

isabelle daeron ishihara
the process of tightly rolling the rugs makes them resistant to compression

isabelle daeron ishihara
blue and white paper spirals are tightly ‘knit’ into the rug

isabelle daeron ishihara
the process involves forming small circles of paper into the shape of a carpet

isabelle daeron ishihara

isabelle daeron ishihara

isabelle-daeron-ishihara-designboom-13
an individually rolled ‘patch’ of the carpet