joep van lieshout envisions 'slavecity' a rational, yet highly unethical dystopian society
 
joep van lieshout envisions 'slavecity' a rational, yet highly unethical dystopian society
jun 23, 2016

joep van lieshout envisions 'slavecity' a rational, yet highly unethical dystopian society

joep van lieshout envisions ‘slavecity’ a rational, yet highly unethical dystopian society

 

 

 

joep van lieshout: slavecity 
de pont museum, tilburg
now through october 16, 2016

 

 

for the first time in the netherlands, museum de pont in tilburg presents joep van lieshout‘s ‘slavecity’. the exhibition comprises a series of models, objects, and works on paper that form a sinister dystopian vision for a rational and highly profitable city that nets 7.8 billion euro per year. in this imagined town of 200,000 inhabitants, values, ethics, aesthetics, morality, food, energy, and economics are totally turned upside-down. 

joep van lieshout slavecity
installation view of ‘slavecity’ at de pont museum, tilburg
all images by peter cox

 

 

 

van lieshout‘s ‘slavecity’ benefits from the latest technology, where participants in the call center work seven hours a day as telemarketers and computer programmers. after their work day in the city, occupants must tend to the fields or inside the workshops for an additional seven hours to maintain the city. the participants’ efficiency is closely monitored — measures are taken if they drop below the optimally set level.

 

‘slavecity’ is the first ‘zero energy’ town, functioning without imported mineral fuel or electricity. the needs of the city are covered by using biogas, solar and wind power, and bio-diesel. everything is recycled — even the participants themselves — whose vital organs are destined for transplantation instead of decaying into dust.

joep van lieshout slavecity
the exhibition is presented for the first time in the netherlands

 

 

 

depicting this recycling process in close detail is the installation ‘cradle to cradle’. this ‘contemporary anatomical theatre’ comprises a high-tech operating room and a semi-industrial slaughterhouse, where bones, skulls, muscle groups and organs lie brightly lit tables. the people-recycling machine is a model of efficiency: organs are used for transplants; flesh, fluids, fat and bones are made into meat; the remainder is used to harvest energy. ‘cradle to cradle’ demonstrates the internal workings of ‘slavecity’ — the result of an overlay rational, sustainable society where ethics hardly play a role.

 

‘slavecity’ is simultaneously presented by zuecca project space at the 2016 venice architecture biennale

joep van lieshout slavecity
the exhibition comprises a series of models, objects, and works on paper

joep van lieshout slavecity
the sinister dystopian vision for a rational and highly profitable city nets 7.8 billion euro per year

joep van lieshout slavecity
the imagined town includes 200,000 inhabitants

joep van lieshout slavecity
values, ethics, aesthetics, morality, food, energy, and economics are totally turned upside-down

joep van lieshout slavecity
‘slavecity’ ‘participants’ work in a call center for seven hours a day as telemarketers and computer programmers

joep van lieshout slavecity
the participants’ efficiency is closely monitored

joep van lieshout slavecity
installation view of ‘the mall’

joep van lieshout slavecity
view of ‘headquarters’ at the exhibition 

joep van lieshout slavecity
in this overlay rational, sustainable society, ethics hardly play a role

joep van lieshout slavecity
‘slavecity’ is simultaneously presented by zuecca project space at the 2016 venice architecture biennale

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