laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic
 

laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic

california-born photographer laura thompson has created a photoseries, which captures yeti-like figures in costumes made of disposable materials. called ‘senseless’, it draws on the mythology of urban myths such as bigfoot to portray society’s dislocation with its natural surroundings.

laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic designboom

images courtesy of the photographer

 

 

laura thompson was particularly interested in a study by claude levi strauss, which described how members of a particular tribe could see venus in full daylight. the anthropologist discovered that this was a skill that western sailors had had in the past, but lost over time since they no longer used it to navigate.

laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic designboom

 

 

based on various anthropological and scientific studies, it has been observed that as people have become more dependent on modern technology and science, people’s senses have gradually dulled and become dislocated with our natural surroundings,’ says thompson.

laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic designboom

 

 

thompson was inspired by the costumes and masks used in animist and shaman cultures to mediate between the human world and the animal or spirit world, as well as the mythology of bigfoot.

laura thompson's photoseries captures yeti-like creatures made from manmade plastic designboom

 

 

she has created a costume to represent each sense, using manmade plastic forks, earplugs, vinyl gloves, air fresheners and compact mirrors. she then photographed an unidentifiable figure wearing each costume, alone in natural surroundings as if some kind of mythical creature.

 

 

I was surprised to learn that you aren’t born with an innate ability to sense things,’ thompson told the british journal of photography.it develops as you’re a child, your senses adapt to the specifics of your environment. advances in technology bring passivity. certain parts of our brains don’t develop because technology is there doing everything for us.’

 

 

what interested me most was that many seemed to be based on existing mythologies and the fact that many of these creatures, seemed to be trapped between two worlds,’ explains thompson.bigfoot being the prime example is not quite human or animal so wanders on the fringe of both, not really belonging to either.’

 

 

the creature has been consumed by our materialistic society to the point they can no longer sense anything. they attempt to go back to nature only to find it’s too late and they’re stuck between these two worlds,’ adds thompson.not quite human not quite animal, it has this in-between quality, this uncomfortableness. people trying to go back to nature have that feeling as well – you can try but you can’t get there.

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy
LOG IN
designboom's comment policy guidelines
generally speaking, if we publish something, it's because we're genuinely interested in the subject. we hope you'll share this interest and if you know even more about it, please share! our goal in the discussion threads is to have good conversation and we prefer constructive opinions. we and our readers have fun with entertaining ones. designboom welcomes alerts about typos, incorrect names, and the like.
the correction is at the discretion of the post editor and may not happen immediately.

what if you disagree with what we or another commenter has to say?
let's hear it! but please understand that offensive, inappropriate, or just plain annoying comments may be deleted or shortened.

- please do not make racist, sexist, anti-semitic, homophobic or otherwise offensive comments.
- please don't personally insult the writers or your fellow commenters.
- please avoid using offensive words, replacing a few letters with asterisks is not a valid workaround.
- please don't include your website or e-mail address in your comments for the purpose of self-promotion.
- please respect jury verdicts and do not discuss offensively on the competition results
(there is only one fist prize, and designboom usually asks renown professionals to help us to promote talent.
in addition to the awarded designs, we do feel that almost all deserve our attention, that is why we publish
the best 100-200 entries too.)

a link is allowed in comments as long as they add value in the form of information, images, humor, etc. (links to the front page of your personal blog or website are not okay). unwelcome links (to commercial products or services of others, offensive material etc. ) will be redacted. and, ... yes, spam gets banned. no, we do not post fake comments.

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

art news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
490,138 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample