australian street artist rone returns to his hometown of melbourne to complete a covert project in homage to the remnants of mid-century australiana. within an abandoned 1900s weatherboard cottage — one of the last remaining structures in an extensive residential building site in the city’s inner north area — the artist has created a ‘fantasy film set’, replete with haunting female portraits and domestic interior settings. the ephemeral ‘omega project’ — exhibited for only a few weeks — continues rone’s longstanding interest in the ‘concept of creating something beautiful within the context of decay and decline.’

rone omega project
the covert project pays homage to the remnants of mid-century australiana

 

 

over the course of a few weeks, surrounded by destruction and construction in the area, rone turned the home into a part art exhibition, part experiential installation. the artist’s signature portraits line the walls of the house, their beauty situated between brokenness and decay. adding to the haunting, cinematic quality of the space is the recreation of typical mid-century australian interiors — like chenille bedspreads, and wood-grained TV sets — conceived by interior stylist carly spooner. ‘these are things that I think a lot of us grew up with,’ rone says. ‘it’s not what you think of as classic australiana, but it feels instantly recognisable as australian. there’s so much about the interiors that I think a lot of people will identify with.’

rone omega project
portraits are set within an abandoned 1900s weatherboard cottage

 

 

the experience of walking through the house feels both sentimental, and melancholic, bringing demise and the inescapable passing of time into sharp focus.

rone omega project
the artist has created a ‘fantasy film set’, replete with haunting female faces and domestic interior settings

rone omega project
the ephemeral ‘omega project’ has been exhibited for only a few weeks

rone omega project
the installation site is one of the last remaining structures in an extensive residential building development 

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