ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gates

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gates

ronny behnert traveled to some of japan’s most remote locations to capture a series of shrines and torii, the traditional japanese gates that mark the transition from the common world to sacred spaces. using long exposure times, sometimes up to five minutes or more, the german photographer has managed to make any distracting elements in the sky or water disappear, resulting in minimalist, eerie landscapes. titlted ‘torii’, the series was awarded first place at the sony world photography awards 2020.

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gateseinootsurugi, japan 2019

all images © ronny behnert

 

 

‘from the beginning I was fascinated by the contrast between perfectionism and connection to the natural environment’, says ronny behnert. ‘evidence of shintoism and buddhism – the most common religions in japan – can be found in every corner of the country.’ from the middle of the pacific ocean to the highest mountains and the deepest forests, the german photographer traveled to some of japan’s most remote locations to track and capture the shrines and torii. typically found at the entrance of shinto shrines, torii are traditional japanese gates that mark the boundary between the common world and the sacred world of the gods.ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gateshakuto, japan 2019

 

 

‘as a photographer I like to create clear, minimalistic photos in black and white, but in japan I started using my color skills to intensify the strong contrasts of japanese culture,’ says behnert, who has been actively working in photography since january of 2007. ‘most of the time I use neutral density filters to force long exposures and keep my work minimalist in style. some of my exposures last five minutes or more, which makes any distracting elements in the water or sky disappear – the longer the exposure, the clearer the photograph.’ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gatesnatakaigan, japan 2019ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gatesmatsue, japan 2019 

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gates

bentenjima, japan 2019

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gatesmeoto iwa, japan 2019

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gatesminato, japan 2019

ronny behnert's long exposure photographs capture remote japanese shrines and torii gatesshirahige, japan 2019

 

 

project info:

 

 

name: torii

photographer: ronny behnert

  • Perfect photograph!

    Idiot7403
    Sep 16, 2020
  • Can someone explain how this effect is done? I don’t understand how you can isolate one object using long exposure. I understand he probably edited the background and anything that wasn’t the object to be more white, but is the reflection also done in post? I don’t know anything about photography, and I’ve never seen a long exposure picture look like this. If someone could explain that’d be great!

    Alexander
    Sep 15, 2020

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