theo jansen's strandbeest interpreted by 3D printing at art basel miami theo jansen's strandbeest interpreted by 3D printing at art basel miami
dec 08, 2014

theo jansen's strandbeest interpreted by 3D printing at art basel miami

theo jansen’s strandbeest interpreted by 3D printing at art basel miami beach
image © designboom

 

 

 

the larger-than-life, wind-powered creatures self-described by dutch artist theo jansen as a ‘new species’ have paraded florida’s sandy shores for art basel miami beachthe peabody essex museum (PEM), massachusetts and swiss luxury watch manufacturer audemars piguet have presented six of jansen’s dream machines alongside an exhibition dedicated to his process and creative thinking, debuting the monumental, 42-foot-long monuanimaris suspendisse.

 

possessing an uncanny humanlike locomotion, the kinetic ‘strandbeests’ (‘beach animals’ in dutch) are intricately constructed from a variety of mediums including PVC tubes, drinking containers and recycled materials, closely acknowledging the physics of motion in their design. lifelike characteristics allow them to be able to respond to their environment by storing wind power in their ‘stomachs’ (made from plastic bottles), changing direction when they sense water and even anchoring themselves during oncoming storms. over the course of nearly 30 years of experimentation and development, these alternative life forms have expanded from rudimentary structures to complex creatures, interpreted further through 3D printed technology. these small-scale crawlers are based on jansen’s original constructions, which have found a ‘new way to multiply, by injecting their digital DNA directly into the shapeways system’, he explains.

 


jansen shows designboom the 1:1 creature in motion, followed by a presentation of the 3D printed small-scale species

 

 

 

above, jansen shows designboom the 1:1 creature in motion, followed by an in-depth explanation into the 3D printed, small-scale species of ‘strandbeest’. additional images and words from the artist describing the evolution of his work and the deeply developed universe he situates his creatures within to follow, on designboom.

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
jansen’s kinetic sculptures have been interpreted further through 3D printed technology
image © designboom

theo jansen adopts 3D printing for strandbeest at art basel miami beach
by adding a code to the shapeways website, artists around the world can interpret the designs through 3D printing
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest interpreted by 3D printing at art basel miami beach
‘animaris suspendisse’
photo by theo jansen

 

 

 

in conjunction with the presentation of the ‘strandbeests’ in miami beach is an exhibition of photographs, sketches of the ‘strandbeests’, video footage of the creatures walking the beaches of scheveningen, an installation of strandbeest ‘fossils’, as well as a representation of the dutch artist’s studio and atelier — all illustrating the meticulous creative process behind jansen’s complex kinetic species.

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
the kinetic ‘strandbeests’ are intricately constructed from PVC tubes, drinking containers and recycled materials
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
six of jansen’s sculptures have been exhibited at art basel miami beach
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
animaris suspendisse, 2014 — evolutionary highlights: wind stomachs and the ability to sense and walk away from the rising tide
image © designboom

 

 

 

‘the biggest strandbeest to date (12 feet in height), suspendisse is equipped to move on its own, using stored air. sails direct air into pistons, which in turn compress it into plastic bottles—jansen calls these receptacles “wind stomachs.” if wind dies down on the beach, this beest can retreat from the rising tide under its own power.’

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
‘animaris suspendisse’ isn’t seen as only an artistic creation, but rather an evolution of previous creatures
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
water bottles act as the structure’s ‘stomach’, propelling it forward in times where there is no wind
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
‘feet’ made from PVC allow wind to flow through, adding locomotion to the framework
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
animaris adulari, 2012 — evolutionary highlights: sweat glands and nose feelers
image © designboom

 

 

 

‘this is the first strandbeest with sweat glands—water distributed by pressure through the beest’s joints, so sand won’t jam them. animaris adulari can walk two ways: powered by wind or pushed by a human. its nose feelers can detect wet sand, letting the beest know that it’s near water. this is one of the smaller beests (about 4 feet tall and 18 feet long). it moves low to the ground and, according to jansen, it looks ‘like herds of dogs on the beach.’

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
animaris ordis, 2006 — evolutionary highlights: the walking unit for current strandbeests
image © designboom

 

 

 

‘animaris ordis walks under wind power, using a sail. it can also be pushed. connect two ordises, and you have animaris turgentia vela, about 7 feet tall and 10 feet long.’

 


jansen presents the PVC joinery that allows the sculptures movement, at art basel miami beach
video courtesy of designboom

theo jansen adopts 3D printing for strandbeest at art basel miami beach
an installation of strandbeest ‘fossils’ is presented alongside the six realized designs
image © designboom

theo jansen's strandbeest adopt 3D printing at art basel miami beach
a detail of one of the joints that allows the ‘strandbeest’ to move
image © designboom

 

  • Amazing stuff.

    Ron Smith says:
  • Absolutely love his work. Love how fluid the movements are couple with a perfect balance

    Jaco says:

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