brutalism defines an architectural movement described by an overall ruggedness and lack of concern to look comfortable, with exposed concrete construction and heavy, monotlithic building blocks. throughout the 1950s to the mid-1970s, masters like le corbusier and marcel breuer laid the groundwork for the then emerging style, which would become popular with governmental institutions and university buildings for its clear communication of strength and functionality. now, structures like breuer’s ‘pirelli building’ in new haven, connecticut and the orange county government center by american architect paul rudolph are revered for their distinct articulation of modular elements and overall, their rejection of the norm.

 

new york-based photographer ty cole specializes in capturing the built environment in its surrounding context. his ongoing series of photographs documenting this style of public architecture peers into a movement increasingly under attack, and seeks to take a closer look at both its allure and aggressiveness.

ty cole brutalism
university of illinois / walter netsch – SOM | main image: orange county government center / paul rudolph
all images © ty cole

ty cole brutalism
university of illinois / walter netsch – SOM

ty cole brutalism
pirelli building / marcel breuer

ty cole brutalism
northwestern university library / walter netsch – SOM

ty cole brutalism
northwestern university library / walter netsch – SOM

ty cole brutalism
northwestern university library / walter netsch – SOM

ty cole brutalism
umass dartmouth / paul rudolph

ty cole brutalism
umass dartmouth / paul rudolph

ty cole brutalism
silver towers NYU / im pei

ty cole brutalism
temple street parking garage / paul rudolph

ty cole brutalism
temple street parking garage / paul rudolph

ty cole brutalism
yale school of engineering & applied science / marcel breuer