carnovsky: RGB exhibition at johanssen gallery carnovsky: RGB exhibition at johanssen gallery
nov 25, 2010

carnovsky: RGB exhibition at johanssen gallery

installation view of carnovsky’s ‘RGB’ exhibition all photos by alvise vivenza

 

 

carnovsky: RGB exhibition johanssen gallery, berlin on now until february 10th, 2011

 

milan-based collective carnovsky (francesco rugi and silvia quintanilla) presents ‘RGB’, an exhibition which showcases a series of wallpapers that mutate and interact with different chromatic stimulus. the wall coverings consist of three different patterns (in red, yellow and blue respectively) that when overlapped, result in a disorientation of images. when colors and patterns mix up, the lines and shapes entwine becoming oneiric and not completely clear. through a filter (a colored light or transparent material) it is possible to see clearly the layers in which the image is composed. each one of the red, green and blue (RGB) filters serve to reveal just one of the three patterns, hiding the other two.

 

 

without the RGB filters, the three overlapping patterns create a chaotic mix of images

 

 

view of the wallpaper in one corner of the gallery

 

 

wallpaper with red filter

 

 

wallpaper with green filter

 

 

wallpaper with blue filter

 

 

another view

 

 

imagery exposed with red filter

 

 

imagery exposed with green filter

 

imagery exposed with blue filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

carnovsky RGB cards

 

 

carnovsky RGB cards under the red filter

 

 

carnovsky RGB cards under the green filter

 

individual carnovsky RGB prints

 

 

exhibition graphics

  • WWWWWWWWWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWW
    too much..
    …cool

    for
    normal
    people

    Stefania Fersini | Nucleo says:
  • Cool!

    CMYK says:
  • Amazing use of collors and light effects! Amazing!

    @NightNiix says:
  • wow!!!!!!!, wonderful, incredible, i love it!!!!!!!!!

    www.pappenpop.com says:
  • Talk about a climax of colour!

    Leslie Wilson-Rutterford says:
  • To me it looks more like CMY than RGB. Using red, green and blue filters (as pictured above) does not hide the other images completely. The blue and green example is actually pretty bad.

    Its sad that someone made all this work to make those large CMY printings and then call the project “RGB”.

    Or maybe it is some kind of irony beeing used here to make fun of me as a technical smartass? Maybe I’m the one beeing laughed at? I’m confused…

    Pantone says:
  • It is quite CMY, but I think the RGB plays a larger role in the whole project. I like the scale of this installation. I do agree that in the blue and green filter effects that the underlying images are still visible, but I think it’s kind of nice.

    not graphic says:
  • It is called RGB because the lights or filters that reveal the images are RGB… and I guess that all the filters are not mean to work the same way, I’ve read in an interview that each filter corrisponds to a different psychological or emotional state… red is when you are awake, when you see things clear and blue is more oneiric when thinks are more confused, actually, when I saw it in Berlin, it was my favorite because it reveals something you haven’t noticed blending it to other worlds… amazing!

    Vale says:
  • cool!

    isaac says:
  • so cool~i like it!!!

    Number6 says:
  • maravillha!!!!!

    NICO says:
  • finally someone asked this question! i really don’t get it, it seems to me like they lost it somewhere in the way, they had in mind RGB which is more popular and easier to spell but CMYK looks better, so they mixed it together, i don’t know..

    why says:
  • When I first read the title and saw the initial three images, I thought similarly, “did they make a mistake and mean to write cmyk?” but after continuing on viewing the images it made sense to me. While cmyk is the color of what is printed on the wall, it seems that the project is titled rgb because of the lights used in each room and that’s what the most intriguing element of this project is.

    msmonro says:

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