charlotte dieckmann + nils ferber: parasite farm charlotte dieckmann + nils ferber: parasite farm
aug 15, 2011

charlotte dieckmann + nils ferber: parasite farm

 

the ‘parasite farm’ by charlotte dieckmann and nils ferber is an indoor compost system that can be easily integrated into your current living environment. the device consists of illuminated plant boxes which fit into shelving units and a larger compost container which can simply be hung from your kitchen table that has an integrated chopping board.

all photos by alexander giesemann

 

 

charlotte dieckmann and nils ferber own words:

 

today 88% of germany’s population lives in cities and only 5.8% of the country’s cultivated land is farmed ecologically. while most fruits and vegetables have become available all year round we are loosing touch with how it was grown, harvested and transported. the expensive, highly compacted urban area doesn’t leave much room for agricultural practices and not everybody has access to a balcony or garden. our answer to that question is the ‘parasite farm’, a system that enables you to compost your biological waste, produce humus soil and to grow your own vegetables and herbs – all within your apartment! to integrate with your interior and your habits both the vermicompost system and the plant boxes use existing furniture as infrastructure. the parasitic objects are fed by your food scraps and provide you – in turn – with fresh vegetables. we hope that this small-scale nutrient cycle makes people discover the fascination of growing you own food and evokes questions about the current industrial food production and possible alternatives.

the cutting board can be slid aside to easily shove food scraps into the vermicompost-container

 to harvest some humus soil you simply shake the grate a bit and pull out the drawer underneath 

the water contained in fresh vegetables or fruit scraps runs through the drawer and is stored in a translucent tank

the nutrient-rich humus soil provides the base for growing vegetables and herbs in your bookshelf a built-in fly trap prevents fruit flies from escaping into your kitchen

 

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication.

  • FANTASTIC WORK!!!
    I’ve seen a lot of the box growers before but i really like the composting box, the design would help me be lazy in the kitchen when separating food wastes from recyclable waste. I’m not so sure about the idea of using the box planters indoors though as providing lamps for each box seems like a waste of energy in the long run. Still a great idea though, and again, sweet work on that composting box!

    oneeyedamoeba says:
  • nice one!

    el magnifico says:
  • Beautiful

    Ladybug says:
  • i doubt the compost works, the smell, timing mosquitos and cockroaches. A compost needs more than a month to become organic waist to dirth. that is a lot of organic material for that gabinet.

    organico says:
  • canniballism

    rok says:
  • I am not sure what they mean by vermicompost and how it works (smellfree or not?), but I know that the Bokashi cultures are smellfree and turn around time is very fast compared to traditional composting. All in all a very nice idea, I would be happy to have it in my kitchen!

    Andrea says:
  • Nice, but why green??

    Sim says:
  • really usefull!!

    inaph says:
  • Thanks for presenting Nils. Great concept, very well presented. The lighting aspect is a prob that can be overcome in other ways of getting natural light to the plants. As Andrea has stated the Bokashi system creates useful compost in a short period of time. When I used that system, I found no flies in the compost d;-)

    Jetwax says:
  • would be even better if it was designed for vermicompost. the vermicompost bin I use is a beaut but it gets the job done.

    mmorgan says:
  • nm the previous comment … just realized this is a vermicompoting bin! ordor totally not an issue with vermicomposting and a month is plenty of time! nice!

    mmorgan says:
  • there is a reason why waste are removed from the living/working environment – they contain microbes and bacteria and emit gases that can cause harm to people. that place is a disaster waiting to happen. decomposting should be done OUTSIDE of the house!

    James Bittoshi says:
  • I have had a vemicomposter for 5+ years (inside – James do some research, vermicompost is not a hot compost and thus doesn’t “emit gases that can cause harm”) and LOVE IT. There is no smell (if there is, the type of smell tells you what to add to correct it – your worm provider will usually answer questions for free) and the ONLY time I saw fruit flies was during the first 2 weeks while the worms were acclimating. I got my worms locally so they reestablished quickly – if you get them from the mail it may take longer. I LOVE this design and would buy it NOW if it were available somewhere. My ONLY concern is with the capacity… worm compost is HEAVY – if you didn’t use it fast enough filling the space allotted would be a bad thing.

    Lisa Hook says:
  • not sure if you understood my post or not. vermiculture is just another way of saying worm poo!
    poo whether from worms or humans is a dirty thing.
    even fertilizer makers “burn” animal waste to kill off bacteria before they are sold as fertilizers.

    poo is poo. no other way to make it clean. and not in my kitchen where i prepare foods for my family!

    James Bittoshi says:
  • A fly trap?
    What use is a fly trap when you have to open the cutting board to dump food waste? Wouldn’t the flies just escape everytime you open the box?

    Mary Heimda says:
  • awesome!

    jsk says:
  • how long does it take to make a compost?

    Ginni says:

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