coca-cola introduces first bottles made using ocean plastic waste
 

coca-cola introduces first bottles made using ocean plastic waste

coca-cola has introduced the world’s first bottle created using recycled plastic waste from the ocean. the company has launched an initial edition of 300 bottles made of 25% plastic from the marine waste collected by volunteers during 84 beach cleanups in spain and portugal.

 

the recycling technology is the result of a partnership between coca-cola, the dutch startup ioniqa technologies and indorama ventures, one of coca-cola’s suppliers of PET plastic. to process the material, ioniqa technologies used a depolymerization technology to break down the PET into its monomers that allow it to be re-produced as a new. it was then sent to an indorama ventures facility to be polymerized into new plastic.

coca-cola introduces first bottles made using ocean plastic

image courtesy of ioniqa

 

 

‘in the immediate term, enhanced recycling will be introduced at commercial scale using waste streams from existing recyclers, including previously unrecyclable plastics and lower-quality recyclables,’ according to coca-cola’s announcement. ‘from 2020, coca-cola plans to roll out this enhanced recycled content in some of its bottles.’

coca-cola introduces first bottles made using ocean plastic

image via the telegraph

 

 

‘the impact of enhanced recycling will be felt on a global scale,’ says tonnis hooghoudt, ceo of ioniqa technologies. ‘by working with coca-cola and indorama to produce this bottle, we aim to show what this technology can deliver. our new plant is now operational and we are bringing this technology to scale. in doing so, we aim to eliminate the concept of single-use plastic and plastic waste altogether.’

 

video by the coca-cola co.

 

 

coca-cola’s aim is to see the term ‘single-use plastic’ become redundant, both in their business and beyond according to the telegraph. if the idea is implemented for mass production, coca-cola will be the first company in the FMCG (fast-moving consumer goods) segment to start selling drinks and food in plastic waste packaging.

 

project info

 

company: coca-cola

product: plastic bottle

partner: ioniqa technologies, indorama ventures, mares circulares

  • uauuu what an invention,
    dear Coca-Cola, can you just go some steps backwards and see your amazing glas bottles that we, as kids always used to return and got new one`s – refilled, 100% reused, and always recyclable …. that was a UauUU project. You still produce plastic that lands in the ocean, you poison the fish, you poison continents and after that collect it and make your new Commercial Bottle Concept. Generations further will blame you for your part in the climate disaster ….

    Youlian Todorov says:
  • Very well said, Youlian.
    From what we se around it is hard to be convinced that the big multinationals like Coca Cola care much about the environment.

    Vesso Georgiev says:
  • yep it’s just green washing

    Florian says:
  • A self issued licence to keep making the other 75% of the plastic! Relying on the public being incredibly stupid enough to miss the deceit. Bring back glass and stop pretendimg this is a move forward please. No new plastic!!!!!

    Fiona says:
  • While I’m glad they’ve found a way to clean up the ocean a little bit, I think we need to hear more of the details in the process to reuse the plastic. Are we trading one problem for another? Are there any waste byproducts from the process? How many times can this new plastic be recycled into new plastic products? I have to wonder if we would be better off using glass bottles, like Youlian mentioned. If there is to a real solution to the problem, it needs to create less or no waste. And from a consumer point of view, how much more will it cost? Higher prices will mean less Coca Cola sold. I’m all for higher prices if there is no environmental impact from this.

    Chris says:
  • And what happens when this marine recycled plastic ends up in the oceans with all the rest of the man made rubbish? It will still be like any other plastic in the sea.

    Deborah says:

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