'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn iida awards 2010
 
'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010
oct 05, 2010

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn iida awards 2010

‘ecooler’ by mey kahn and boaz kahn

‘ecooler’ by mey kahn and boaz kahn from israel is one of the third prize winners of ‘iida awards 2010‘, organized by designboom in collaboration with incheon metropolitan city.

using passive and natural cooling methods, the ‘ecooler’ screen is a system of hollow ceramic tiles that cools a room by running water through its channels.

designer’s own words: the ‘ecooler’ tile screen offers an alternative for cooling internal spaces without the use of electricity it is based on a hollow ceramic tile that can carry and transfer water. using a designated connector, it can be connected to other tiles, creating a natural cooling screen. ‘ecooler’ is a combination between two traditional middle-eastern elements: the mashrabiya and the jara. the mashrabiya is an architectural element that bears social values as a mediator between the inside and the outside. it is designed to allow air and light into internal spaces. the jara is an ancient jug used for cooling water by seepage and evaporation through the clay. unlike today’s air conditioner that creates separation between the user and the environment while exaggerating climate conditions, the ‘ecooler’ system takes responsibility and allows you to live in harmony with the environment.

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010 connector joint

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010 four tiles configured together

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010 the two traditional middle-eastern elements: the jara (to the left) and the mashrabiya (to the right)

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010 rendering of ‘ecooler’ tile screen

'ecooler' by mey + boaz kahn   iida awards 2010 production shots

— for those who wish to republish an excerpt of this article, please have the courtesy to mention that the project is a part of the iida awards 2010 competition, organized by designboom in collaboration with incheon metropolitan city, and link back to the original publication on designboom. thank you.

  • Where can I buy one?

    Charlene Wyatt
  • ROB
    evaporative cooling is used in industrial and air conditioning processes too. this is unglazed material and therefore porous.
    see how it works:
    http://practicalaction.org/practicalanswers/images/ceramic_refrigerator.jpg

    not in HaWAI
  • The only way to make this work, is, well, not green. It would not cool a room at all; it would cool the water inside the thin walls of the ceramics, evaporation would transfer the heat to increase the ambient air temperature, which would be absorbed by the ceramic, brass and water. It’s like trying to cool a room with the door to the refrigerator open. This only works if the compressor is in a separate location… And it would just create humidity, possibly allowing moss, mold, or algae to grow on the surface. Looks cool–but that’s about it.

    ROBinHAWAII
  • Beautiful! Looks so aesthetic and nevertheless functional. I also liked other things on their website
    [url=http://www.studiokahn.com] studiokahn.com [/url],

    Jonathan
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