egle stonkute manipulates mirrors to skew our perceptions of self
 
egle stonkute manipulates mirrors to skew our perceptions of self
jun 27, 2014

egle stonkute manipulates mirrors to skew our perceptions of self

eglė stonkutė deforms vanity with series of reflections
all images courtesy of eglė stonkutė

 

 

 

in the middle ages, looking at a mirror too often was considered a sin. with the technologies of today’s society, the act of capturing one’s appearance has been expanded towards the digital world and its media. taking cues from these concepts, industrial designer eglė stonkutė has developed ‘reflections: narcissuses and other flowers,’ a series of constructions that deform the way people perceive themselves in mirrors and transparent materials. these manipulations make allusions to a moving surface such as water, which is effected by exterior elements such as sound and wind. the intent of the work is to attract attention to inner beauty by listening to oneself.

 

 


video courtesy of eglė stonkutė

 

 

 

the first installation is an interpretation of circular tides of motion within a liquid body. consisting of a single plastic sheet, ripples expand radially away from a center point as if the plane’s calm state has been disrupted by the touch of a finger. the result is a continuously changing series of rings recreating the environment.

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
view of the first mirror

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
circular waves of water in plastic

 

 

 

for the next iteration, an excerpt from the legend of narcissus serves as its basis: ‘…how many times he put his hands into the water trying to take his sister out of the river that many times he failed…’ hence, the form appears as a curved surface that creates elongated representations of the viewer. in addition, a small, concave, moving mirror turns the view upside-down to reference the distortion that can be seen through a drop of water.egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
the curved surface elongates the form

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
the mirror is an interpretation of the myth of narcissus 

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
closeup of the small mirror that replicates a drop of water

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
the reflection of the mirror gets bigger at a certain distance

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
the installation in use

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
detail of a narcissus excerpt running across the mirror

 

 

 

the third structure is composed of crooked mirror strips that vertically skew the physical characteristics of anyone standing in front of it. every other layer undulates with the same curvature, suggesting that two surfaces have been proportionally sliced and placed in relation to one another. the produced effect develops an emphasized distance between inhabitants and their true appearance. stonkute explains her philosophy behind the work, ‘pleasant emotions and unexpected perspectives of a reflection in all the mirrors move people away to a world outside of reflections and let them dive into things that matter most – feelings and self-analysis.’

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
composition of strips

egle stonkute reflections mirrors skew perceptions
stonkute standing with her creations

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

design news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
506,222 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample
designboom magazine