felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon traditional calabesh gourd
 
felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd
jul 01, 2012

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon traditional calabesh gourd

‘mategon’ by felix hardmood beck with felix groll image courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd

berlin-based designers felix hardmood beck and felix groll have developed ‘mategon’. the teapot and cup are a re-investigation of the traditional calabesh gourd, a container made from the dried, hollowed-out shell from a fruit of the same name. the objects infuse polygonal structures from its computerized background with the organic features of the plant. the wooden form of each receptacle was achieved with modern technologies such as 3d printing for preliminary tests and multi-axis routing for the final outcome.

the vessels hold finely chopped mate leaves, creating an infusion drink originating in south america called ‘yerba mate’. conventionally, the tea is drunk from a metal straw called a ‘bombilla’. the range was shown at dmy berlin 2012.

update (7/9/12): the material used to create the design was an outcome of testing a number of different woods such as maple, alder, ash, beech and elm from sustainable resources within germany. a limited series will use an old beam of tropical ovangkol wood which the designers found at a turners workshop in berlin kreuzberg that was felled almost a century ago.

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd the objects are created using modern technologies such as multi-axis routing image © designboom

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd the vessel holds a drink called ‘yerba mate’ image © designboom

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd tests of the design image © designboom

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd process image with a  multi-axis router image courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd the objects slowly coming to life image courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd 3d printed lineup image courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd 3d printed version and wooden version image courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd the artist at DMY berlin 2012 image © designboom

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourd the collection at the stall image © designboom

felix hardmood beck + felix groll: mategon   traditional calabesh gourdcomputerized sketch of the concept of the utah teapot, mategon, and bombilla strawimage courtesy of felix hardmood beck and felix groll

  • This is Felix Hardmood Beck. I am one of the designers of the Mategon object. I just stumbled across the comments and I want to clarify our position regarding the sustainability question mentioned above:

    I think every designer should consider the implications of his or her designs very well and I appreciate this dicussion very much! Besides recycling, the choice of the material, of course, is one of the most important questions.

    In our case, the most important question is which kind of wood we use and where it comes from: We tested different kinds of wood for the Mategon: maple, alder, ash, beech and elm tree. Those come from sustainable resources within Germany. We are still considering which wood to use for the production of the Mategon from those mentioned above. So, I think the choice of any of them is legitimate.

    For a limited series only, we plan to recycle an old wood beam of Ovangkol wood which we found at a wood turners workshop in Berlin Kreuzberg. It is a family enterprise and this beam has been drying there for over 85 years (the owner of the enterprise guarantees that and I trust him!). So this piece of wood was felled almost a century ago during a time where Ovangkol was regrettably not under protection. To be clear on that point: Ovangkol is a tropical wood and like every normal thinking person of todays time we are a hundred percent against cutting trees in rain forrests. We would never consider to use any protected wood felled nowadays! But in this particular case I consider it to be reprocessing of an already existing material and if this helps to create awareness about deforestation I would be kind of proud about that!!!

    I am vey much interested on your feedback about that – shall we go for an awareness design to trigger an even bigger discussion or shall we just go for the sustainable wood choices mentioned above only? I am glad for feedback! If there are any ideas, concerns, critics or questions just contact me via twitter ([url=https://twitter.com/el_mategon] el_mategon [/url]), mail ([email protected]) or skype (felix_h_beck).

    Felix Hardmood Beck
  • Of course you can use calabesh gourd fruit, and It will still be used and I prefer that, but if you want to make your approach as an industrial designer, and not as an artisan, that doesn mean you HAVE to make things easier or more comfortable, thats the typicall cliché of our profession, and what you are told in the first years of college. There are other things involved, as the disposal, tradition, semantics, etc. There are other materials used to make mates that are also heat-insulating, harmless, attractive, and they also accomplish the function of the product. Perhaps the silicone mate helps you to take out the \”yerba\” but you still have to rinse to completely clean it. And the aspect of the space is over estimated, being the fact that you also have to carry the \”yerba\”, sugar, and the \”bombilla\” (metal straw). Of course there is subjectivity in the beauty opinion, and we will not agree in that, but for a mate beauty is very important, because of that there are a lot of traditional hand creafted mates with lots of different decorations.
    Thats why I prefer this mategon, that using a traditional or already used material, plays and attracts with its shape, using wood, that absorved CO2 during its growth, keeps tradition and it is also biodegradable, instead of the silicone one.

    Por supuesto, se puede usar calabaza, y todavía se usa y yo prefiero eso, pero si queres hacer tu propuesta como diseñador industrial, y no como un artesano, eso no significa que tenes que hacer que las cosas sean más fáciles de usar o más cómodas, ese es el típico cliché de nuestra profesión, y lo que se dice en los primeros años de universidad. Hay otras cosas involucradas, como la disposición, la tradición, la semántica, etc Hay otros materiales utilizados para hacer mates que también son aislantes, atractivos, y también cumplen la función del producto. Tal vez el mate de silicona ayuda a sacar la yerba, pero igual tenes que enjuagarlo como a cualquier otro mate. Y el aspecto del espacio está sobre estimado, siendo el hecho de que también tenes que llevar la yerba, el azúcar, y la bombilla. Por supuesto que hay subjetividad en la opinión de la belleza, y no estaremos de acuerdo en eso, pero la belleza de un mate también es importante, por algo existen muchos mates artesanales con muchas decoraciones diferentes. Es por eso que prefiero este mategon, que usa un material tradicional o ya utilizado, reinterpreta y atrae con su forma, usando madera, que absorbió CO2 durante su crecimiento, mantiene la tradición y además es biodegradable, propiedades que la silicona no tiene.
    Saludos

    Juan P.
  • \”that can be a mistake, but that can be solved easily by using wood from sustainable resources, o even use industry\’s leftovers or scrap..\”, yes or using a mate (calabesh gourd fruit) like always, instead of wasting wood…. nothing new here, wooden mates has always been made, of course not in germany. Para mi compatriota le respondo que me parece mas destacable el mate de silicona ya que si es una innovación en diseño, o sea hay un estudio sobre el funcionamiento y una propuesta de como resolverlo, pensá que al ser de silicona lo podés aplastar por lo tanto ocupa menos espacio, si queda con yerba por dias no toma gusto a humedad (algo que me pasó varias veces), el material es aislante, en fin con pocas decisiones de diseño se logra un producto que satisface la necesidad funcional mejor que muchas soluciones tradicionales, eso es buen diseño, después si es lindo es subjetivo. en el caso presentado acá es simplemente eso, hacer un mate lindo…. para eso realmente prefiero un mate clasico….

    lgrippo
  • that can be a mistake, but that can be solved easily by using wood from sustainable resources, o even use industry’s leftovers or scrap..

    Juan P.
  • well its product is done with wood from the rainforrest… sorry this is a no-go !. On the whole fair talking about sustainability and then cutting trees for mate cubes, shame !

    staydesign
  • -This deserves Spanish…

    aunque se escribir en ingles, te escribo en castellano porque el origen de tu diseño lo merece, y es mi idioma, soy argentino, y diseñador industrial.
    Te felicito!!! lograste hacer algo que muchos diseñadores argentinos no hacen con un elemento de nuestra cultura con tanta historia y variaciones, tanto de forma y material. Aca están de moda unos mates horribles de silicona, que no supieron captar lo que vos sí, quizás es porque observándo desde otra lugar podés entender mejor la esencia de nuestro emblemático mate. Me gusta mucho tu diseño, y creo que logra darle un toque de modernidad, manteniendo una materialidad más acorde, que ya se usa para hacer mates (generalmente torneados), y que además es biodegradable..
    Vas a venderlos en Argentina? porque acá tenés mercado seguro!
    Saludos!

    Juan P.

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