huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art
 
huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art
nov 06, 2013

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

 

 

elissa medina presented ‘huichol’ rug, a floor covering influenced by mexican folk art and hand-produced in mexico, at the 2013 abierto mexicano de diseno. with a clear reference to traditional the artist’s sculptural work, the design reflects a dichotomy mexico is experiencing nowadays, both affirming its cultural identity and being part of a globalized world.

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

it’s nod to animal skin rugs evokes history using a contemporary language, based on the pixel as an entity of design and mathematical precision of computer based manufacturing. therefore the skin is no longer considered as a trophy but rather a playful metaphor.

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

measuring is 200 x 250 cm is produced with 100% wool felt, certified oeko tex standard 100, biodegradable, retardant to fire and naturally waterproof. it takes approximately 80 hours to stitch together and uses 2.5 km of thread, each piece is designed specifically to the client’s color preferences.

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art
the rug on display at san idefonso during abierto mexicano de diseno 2013

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

 

huichol rug by elissa medina is influenced by mexican folk art

 

  • Beautiful work congratulations!!!!

    Julio Sannazzaro says:
  • 🙂 #win

    Felipe Alvarez says:
  • Nice photos and nice rug, though the write up is a little pretentious, since when has a cow skin rug been considered a trophy?

    And to say this “design reflects a dichotomy mexico is experiencing” is far fetched. Although Huichols are legally Mexican, I would argue that they don’t feel Mexican, just as a Mexican doesn’t feel Huichol. The Huichol are not part of the Mexican identity and neither is their art, any more than Navajos in the US. If anything the rug should be about the Huichols affirming their cultural identity and being part of a globalized world, but not Mexicans.

    The Huichol are very private people who mostly live deep inside a small part of the Sierra Madre. They are quite territorial and any non Huichol are discouraged from wondering into their territory uninvited. I imagine that 99% of Mexicans has never even spoken to a Huichol besides maybe to barter for a souvenir.

    I would argue that ethnic inspiration in design is just an easy way for designers to create interesting designs and feel they have achieved design success comparable to designers from other countries. But while they may become famous for creating a “Mexican” design style, they are not much more than opportunistically interchanging a common graphic from one object to another. Lets not make this rug such a meaningful cultural symbol, it’s pop-design and no different from the Huichol Dunny figurines that sell on ebay.

    Markkit says:
  • Hello Felipe, I don’t think the rug is a cow. Exotic animal’s skin such as zebras and tigers etc., have been used as rugs and trophies. The fact that the only lecture you have of this design being a cow shows how limited your interpretation of this rug is. Also, cheer up!

    Patricia says:

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