itamar burstein: flex family
 
itamar burstein: flex family itamar burstein: flex family
feb 11, 2010

itamar burstein: flex family

‘flex’ chair image © dafna grossman

in his ‘flex’ series, israeli designer itamar burstein creates furniture designs using a new technique to achieve curvature in wood. in contrast to traditional methods whereby wood is steamed, shaped in a mould and dried, burnstein uses a more simplified process.

he removes a core piece from the larger piece of wood. the two pieces are then glued together using pressure. in doing so, he reduces the amount of tools, energy and time taken by traditional production methods.

the project was done for VIA france as part of the annual design support program. it was showcased during maison & objet 2010 at VIA gallery, paris. the project will remain on display until march 7th, 2010.

image © dafna grossman

image © dafna grossmanimage © marie flores

image © dafna grossman

image © dafna grossman

‘flex’ coathanger image © dafna grossman

image © dafna grossman

  • beautiful.

    Steven says:
  • this is a good looking chair. nice

    modular says:
  • simplified process but more material + wasted material. it’s hard to justify this direction.

    jpa says:
  • more material maybe but perhaps less processing energy and time. One hand gives, the other takes away.

    peter says:
  • great idea and look well,maby the join need to be less longer,than u waste less material-small filet

    asaf says:
  • clever

    oliver says:
  • Great design, beautiful work. I however think that the energy used during the routing process would be equal to or more than steam bending. The biggest consideration however is material use/waste.

    kent gration says:
  • Very simplistic.
    Almost maruni-chair style alike. I’ll still prefer the hiroshima chair.

    jaymee says:
  • Cool

    Pete Wongs says:
  • “in contrast to traditional methods whereby
    wood is steamed, shaped in a mould and dried, burnstein uses a more simplified process.” – Really, simpler? Steaming and bending wood, especially at these thicknesses, wouldn’t be very difficult or time consuming.

    “he removes a core piece from the larger piece of wood. the two pieces are then glued together
    using pressure. in doing so, he reduces the amount of tools, energy and time taken by traditional
    production methods.” – I agree with several of the other comments, this process could use less energy/time/tools, but with example of the chair – I am guessing the opposite. The bend for the arm of the chair, that piece of darker wood is a solid curve, imagine how you get a curve of wood like that/ with correct grain strength. There would be a considerable waste of wood. On the other hand the lighter wood that makes the arm looks to be continuous, thats pretty nice, if he able to free form the piece after he removes the thicker portions, and using pre cnc cut darker pieces he can easily bend to a designated form/function – now thats an innovative idea.

    gimmy says:
  • Gimmy, this is the idea! the two front legs and back rest are made of one long pre cnc cut light wood. After cutting the dark wood parts the assembly is done without steaming, just bent light wood on dark wood and glued. The thin light wood has such flexibility that it bends easily.

    I have seen the project in the gallery in Paris, Nice work.

    JosephP says:
  • I like this, but I believe I see a flaw. Most of the joints are gluing endgrain to endgrain, which is generally inferior. I’d like to know if any of those chair legs break.

    J God says:
  • Beautiful 2 kinds of wood, look like chairs : Alvar Aalto

    ruudvanthul says:
  • This is nice, but I like this other “Flex” project better:

    [url=https://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/8/view/8343/emiliano-godoy-camouflage-armchair-and-flex-coffee-table.html] Emiliano Godoy at designboom [/url]

    Seems more efficient.

    Jen says:

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