100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly
 

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

dutch company offers a solution to one of music festival’s biggest problems – waste. each year mountains of land waste are left behind formed of the things people can’t be bothered to deal with, one of which is tents. offering a more eco-friendly, easy-to-throw-away alternative, designers wout kommer & jan portheine have created kartent, a 100% recyclable cardboard for the 3-day festival.

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

images courtesy of kartent

 

 

the kartent is made entirely out of un-coated and thick cardboard providing a structural strength not found in a standard tent. each tent is designed to host two people with room for storage and has a 3.3-square-meter floor plan with a small back window to keep it fresh. according to their website a kartent ‘will stay dry with some showers for sure’ and ‘will perform similar under heavy conditions as a regular tent would‘ for several days.

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

 

 

kartent partners with festivals to pre-pitch their tents meaning festival-goers don’t need to carry the extra weight. at the end of the festival kartent takes the waste to a local recycling facility. they also offer an opportunity for brands to advertise on the sides of them, reducing the price for the consumer which can range from 34.95 (that’s about $40) for a junior size and a ‘home’ size for 49.95 (around $56).

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

100% recyclable cardboard tents are pitching up at festivals in a bid to make them more eco-friendly

  • Hey Marty. You’ve never witnessed what happens when a ‘conventional’ meets a flame have you? Anybody who has will tell you that not only does the fire spread at a frightening speed but it is also very difficult to extinguish which (as these tents are made using materials derived from hydro-carbons) is to be expected. Unfortunately, as bad as they undoubtedly are, these two are far from the worst aspect involved. When ‘conventional’ tents burn they drip molten fibre onto anybody unlucky enough to be in the tent at the time which then cools by transferring its heat to the skin it has landed on causing excruciating pain, this cooling process causes it to stick to the skin which, in turn, leads to terrible lifelong scarring. So, if I wanted a single use tent and fire safely was my primary concern then I’d take a cardboard tent every time.

    Tony
  • Looks like a horrific fire hazard to me.

    Marty
  • This would seem to be a great solution for a perennial problem, namely spoilt brats simply being too lazy to pack their tent away & take it home for next time.
    And it’s not just wet muddy tents that are abandoned. Having just returned from a bone dry Glastonbury with no mud in sight, loads of tents were still left where the stood. It’s so depressing, especially for a festival that sets the standards for recycling and eco-awareness. No plastic use across the festival but idiots who leave their tents because mummy & daddy will buy them another one….

    Mike
  • Heard the designer on BBC Radio 4 yesterday, he agreed that “reusable” tents are best for environment, but the reality is kids won’t lug muddy wet (heavy) tents home, clean them and store till next year, so this is a good solution, all but the doors are reused, they are recycled.

    Christina Meiklejohn
  • Didn’t anyone read the article? They said it will hold up in rain as well as a regular tent. And how are you going to suffocate in one? The article states it also has a window.

    Drewzer
  • Are these waterproof? Please post photos of inside. How easy are they to assemble?

    Sally Clark
  • They work great! Room for two and storage. Can stay in the rain for three days. There is a video on Facebook. So, you can see. What it looks like inside and out.

    Tammy
more comments

have something to add? share your thoughts in our comments section below.
all comments are reviewed for the purposes of moderation before publishing.

comments policy

PRODUCT LIBRARY

a diverse digital database that acts as a valuable guide in gaining insight and information about a product directly from the manufacturer, and serves as a rich reference point in developing a project or scheme.

design news

×
keep up with our daily and weekly stories
507,098 subscribers
- see sample
- see sample
designboom magazine