retro OTO electric bicycles reach 65 km/h and feature start-stop system
 
retro OTO electric bicycles reach 65 km/h and feature start-stop system
aug 04, 2014

retro OTO electric bicycles reach 65 km/h and feature start-stop system

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles
all images courtesy OTO

 

 

 

barcelona-based artisanal bike studio OTO cycles have taken a page from mid-century ‘craft bicycle’ design to create a series of aluminum electric bikes. the retro two-wheelers are detailed with custom components such as leather saddles and grips, a side tank which houses the 250w electric motor and NCM batteries, and an LCD display with built in cycle computer. despite weighing 23 kgs, the bikes are capable of reaching speeds of up-to 65 km/h and boast a start-stop system which goes from 0-6 km/h without the need for pedaling. to learn more about OTO and their current offering, see here.

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

OTOK model in olive green

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

 OTOK model in papaya orange with dropped aluminum handlebars

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

 the electric motor and battery is housed inside the retro-styled side tank

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

 OTOR model in red / matte black

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

the bikes feature an LCD screen for displaying info like speed, distance and battery life

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

details include leather saddles and handlebars

hand-crafted OTO electric bikes resemble retro motorcycles

  • To those stating that it is too similar to other, retro styled electric bikes; you are probably not aware of the rich board tracker, cafe racer and lowrider legacies where all these bikes got their inspiration from (as there are many more). It is as similar to those Derringer bicycles as a BMW is to a Volvo: in concept pretty much the same thing but each with their own, unique character. That being said, I really like these ones; they kept the design and construction very light and compact compared to the competition, they look awesome (especially the RaceR) and their prices start at around 2500 euro’s which is a steal in the vintage e-bike world! Very well done, Oto Cycles. Only thing I don’t like that much is their logo being featured so prominently on each bike but you could probably easily customize it with your own graphics. And yeah, it’s a rear wheel hub motor and located in the tank 🙂

    Dirk Jan
  • These bikes are a superior design to the derringer, IMHO

    mike h
  • Like the concept, not the execution so much. It’s a little ungainly to my eyes, looking stretched and saggy…! Agree about Belt-drive; chain is noisy, potentially dangerous and dirty. Apart from that, I applaud getting the project up and running – not easy.

    EM
  • Beautiful bicycle design. Although OTO don’t seem to have incorporated a rear tail light, which one would expect considering they have built in batteries; also there’s safety requirements for night riding.

    OllyS
  • ‘making electric cool – giving electric tech some character – very refreshing, in a nostalgic kind of way. ‘appealing to a new sector – well done!!

    CraigT
  • Just had a look at the Derringer bikes, would have to agree these are way too similar.

    SJS
  • The OTOK is way to similar to the derringer bicycle… I would even say it´s close to a copy.
    The design of the frame, the shape of the gas tank with those bumps on the sides, the 45º seat tube… Too similar to be coincidence…

    what?
  • These are the first 1800’s influenced bikes I have seen that do not look awful. My only suggestion is that rather than an exposed chain that will get your pants leg dirty, use a belt drive instead.

    MichaelC
  • It’s pretty obvious the motor is not in the tank as written in the article. There is no connection to the wheels, I believe the motor is incorporated in the hub of the rear wheel. So you might as well have just posted the pretty pictures, which are pretty, I must admit.

    Mike
  • The battery is in the tank, the motor is in the wheel hub .

    Burt Graber

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