during maison et objet september 2017, french designer sam baron — who directs fabrica’s design studio in treviso, italy — curated an exhibition inside the recently-opened, first paris location of co-working space, WeWork. a 1920s motif is manifested throughout the space, highlighted by rich, metallic finishes and luxurious fabrics that reflect the original building’s beaux-arts structure.

sam baron WeWork paris
‘trésors quotidiens’ displays a series of nostalgic collectibles
image © thomas chéné

 

 

the exhibition ‘trésors quotidiens’ at WeWork la fayette shows a series of nostalgic collectibles — physical products in an increasingly digital era. baron’s selection includes approximately 35 products that enhance the creative workspace, chosen from 20 iconic galleries, bookstores and concept stores throughout paris. the thoughtful array of objects come from some of baron’s favorite parisian outposts: paper clips by house doctor from bensimon home, the iconic enzo mari table calendar from concept store merci; and a fornasetti moustache teapot from l’eclaireur, just to name a few. presented during paris design week, visitors to ‘trésors quotidiens’ are provided with an illustrated map of paris, indicating where each displayed object can be purchased.

sam baron WeWork paris
the selection has been made from 20 iconic galleries, bookstores and concept stores throughout paris
image © thomas chéné

 

 

WeWork — the new york–based office-sharing giant — is a design-driven brand that provides co-working spaces in over 150 locations in 15 different countries. the company, co-founded by entrepreneurs miguel mckelvey and adam neumann, has recently made its first foray into france. created in collaboration with local firm axel schoenert architectes, the new space is housed in an art deco building building on 33, rue la fayette, in paris’ ninth arrondissement — just blocks away from gare st lazare and the opera garnier.

 

with about 130,000-square-feet (about 12,000-square-meters), the central glass-ceilinged atrium — whose original glass blocks remain intact — offers members abundant natural light and ample space to work, play, and congregate in jewel-toned banquettes. the space is now open and accepting membership applications.

sam baron WeWork paris
the thoughtful array of objects come from some of baron’s favorite parisian outposts
image © thomas chéné

sam baron WeWork paris
a 1920s motif is manifested throughout the space
image by benoit florencon


the original building’s beaux-arts structure is highlighted by rich, metallic finishes and luxurious textiles
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork parissam baron WeWork paris
the new space has been created in collaboration with local firm axel schoenert architectes 
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
the co-working location is housed in an art deco building building on 33, rue la fayette, in paris
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
the site comprises about 130,000-square-feet (about 12,000-square-meters)
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
WeWork members have abundant natural light and ample space to work
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
members can congregate in jewel-toned banquettes
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
the location marks the company’s first foray into france
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
outdoor patios offer space for members to enjoy views of the city 
image by benoit florencon

sam baron WeWork paris
baron’s selection includes approximately 35 products that enhance and inspire the workspace

sam baron WeWork paris
visitors are provided with an illustrated map of paris, indicating where each displayed object can be purchased

sam baron WeWork paris
brittney hart, head of interior design for WeWork, and sam baron, director of fabrica design studio in treviso, italy
image © thomas chéné

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