sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin

abyssicide: bone sculptures grown from water

 

In the throes of a climate crisis, ABYSSICIDE is an installation of body-related bone sculptures grown from water, created through computational design and robotic fabrication. Designed by Sruli Recht and the RMIT Architecture Tectonic Formation Lab for Melbourne Design Week, the three suspended sculpture sets envision a future where the video’s protagonists press the materials into their skin, submerge, and become one with the sea.

 

As the ocean levels rise, the ‘garments for drowning in’ grow into a coral, layer by layer, up and around the body, employing a biomimetic technique that mimics the process of accretion by which coral forms its skeleton. Seawater then undergoes a metamorphosis from an aqueous phase into solid stone material, forming sculptures suspended in a pose of submission. 

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
image by Earl Carter

 

 

Sruli Recht tackles rising sea levels

 

ABYSSICIDE discusses time, water, the value of resource, and the acceleration of the commodity lifestyle industry. In the material process, with research led by Mark Edgoose, a singular limestone biomass grows slowly over time, just as an organism, by the manipulation of electrified seawater and negatively charged surfaces. ‘This is Aquamancy, Geo-Punk – hacking geology to grow clothing, to build itself back up, using a completely untapped resource, solidifying the endless ocean minerals, without harm,’ notes designer Sruli Recht. In growing bone-like garments, a coral lattice emerges from the liquid, forming itself while accreting onto the fine conductive structure, presenting spontaneous growth, layer by layer, until a dense matrix forms in the soft algorithmic morphologies, by turning water into wearables.

 

Counter to the trend of fast fashion, ABYSSICIDE looks at an ultimate slow fashion – based on a geological deep-time — employing a slow-growth resource method developed by Recht. In the ocean, this renewable resource encourages biodiversity, and the project highlights the wider benefits of living in fewer garments for longer. Further, the development processes are manifold, combining ancient and modern techniques, creating a chorus of methods that bring water to life in solid, intricate forms. It begins with VR modelling, parametric coding, robotic incremental sheet forming, nylon 3D prints, augmented reality fabrication, and electroforming for conductive surfacing. These forms are sacrificed to the biomimetic principles of coral growth, submerging forms in electrified seawater to generate limestone masses. Controlled electrolysis in seawater triggers limestone accretion on conductive materials, forming a singular limestone biomass.

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
ABYSSICIDE ‘garments for drowning in’ | image by Earl Carter

 

 

unveiled at melbourne design week

 

‘By mimicking the way coral built its skeletal structure, I figured out a way to straight up turn arctic seawater into solid objects,’ says Sruli Recht. ‘It could have been a revolution in architecture, alternative resource manufacture, zero energy materials – I imagine buildings grown right out of the water from knitted recycled wire suspended from solar and tidal charging pontoons in the middle of a silent ocean. But no. I wanted to make fragile, devastatingly thin eggshell knives. And prepare rituals for the tidal rise. We are all so fascinated with death, yet so fearful of dying.’

 

ABYSSICIDE unfolded for the Melbourne Design Week at Hanover House, showcasing transformative sculptures and ritual objects born from the fusion between ancient techniques and futuristic visions. Imagining a sustainable future, the occasion initiates a dialogue on circularity, sacrifice, and the extended potential of the renewable materials we can harvest.

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
as ocean levels rise, they grow into a coral, layer by layer | image by Earl Carter

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
designed by Sruli Recht and the RMIT Architecture Tectonic Formation Lab | image by Earl Carter

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
created through computational design and robotic fabrication | image by Earl Carter

 

 

surreal suspended sculptures of a generation in the future

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
ABYSSICIDE looks at an ultimate slow fashion, based on a geological deep-time | image by Marinó Thorlacius

abyssicide-sruli-recht-designboom-1

a site-specific installation of body-related bone sculptures grown from water

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
in growing bone-like garments, a coral lattice emerges from the liquid

abyssicide garments for drowning in 6
image by Marinó Thorlacius

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
image by Marinó Thorlacius

 

 

the protagonists press the materials into their skin, submerge, and become one with the sea.

abyssicide-sruli-recht-designboom-2

a futuristic installation addressing rising ocean levels

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
a singular limestone biomass grows slowly over time, just as an organism

sruli recht's abyssicide 'garments for drowning in' metamorphose water into coral on skin
the development processes combines ancient and modern techniques, including VR modelling and nylon 3D prints

 

 

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image by Marinó Thorlacius
image by Marinó Thorlacius
image by Marinó Thorlacius
image by Marinó Thorlacius
image by Marinó Thorlacius
image by Marinó Thorlacius

project info:

 

name: ABYSSICIDE
designer: Sruli Recht (@sruli_recht), RMIT Architecture Tectonic Formation Lab

project team: Roland Snooks, Jackson Bi, Mark Edgoose, Marc Gibson, Hesam Mohamed

development: Raphael Recht, Aljoscha Bolte, Dean Leitch, Rye Leitch, Lexi Manitakis, George Ballingal, Leo Södergren, Julina Bezold, Taj Alexander, Christoph Köhrer, Flavia Bon, Joanna Cramoisan, Martin Hanczyc, Nusi Quero, Jarred Eberhardt

fabrication: Dale Manandic, Nic Bao, Ethan Liu, Corliss Xian, Cynthis Chen, Zeke Zhang, Renling Zhang

installation: Lena Rowe, Eric Chen

workshop: Christopher Ferris, Ron Ellazam, Matty Fuller, Tristan Janle, Harry Zanios

advisors: Dr. Tom Goreau, Liam Young, Paul Bennet, Dennis Pahpitis, Daniel Bense, Dr Gureua, Andri Snær Magnason, Daniel Bailey, Frank Verkade, Sigga Spark

photography and film: Marino Thorlacius | @marinothorlacius

sound: Valgeir Sigurðsson

 

commissioned by: Melbourne Design Week: Ewan McEoin and Simone LeAmon

supported by: Melbourne Design Week, RMIT University, School of Architecture and Urban Design, School of Art, Enabling Impact Platforms

presented by: Hanover House

 

 

designboom has received this project from our DIY submissions feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: ravail khan | designboom

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